Following Potential *2020* Draftees

Right now, I wouldn't touch McDaniels with a ten foot pole, and I was extremely high on him coming into this season. Is he talented? Yes, but I question his BBIQ and his desire. He reminds me of his brother, which isn't a compliment. I wish him well, but on another team. As a comparison, if I were able to pit McDaniels one on one against Achiuwa, Precious would destroy him on both ends of the court.

I know your a big stat guy, but I'm not, and let me explain that. About 85% of my judgement is based on what I see with my own eye's, and I've seldom been wrong. I put about 15% of my judgement on stats. The reason is, my eye and my brain can tell me things that stats never can. Stats are fixed in time. A missed shot will always remain a missed shot, and if you judge a player on that moment in time, then your a fool (I'm generalizing). Point is, were talking about players that most times are 18 or 19 years old.

In Achiuwa's case, he didn't start playing until the 8th grade. He didn't get serious instruction until highschool, and then college. So he came to the game a bit late, which I have to take into consideration, unlike a player like McDaniels who was likely playing BB when he was 5 years old. So I look at the growth rate of both players, and I move Achiuwa ahead of McDaniels. You give consideration to McDaniels, who shot 33% from the three, but disparage Achiuwa who shot 32.5% from the three. Really? Simply because of McDaniels free throw percentage?

If you judged every players ability to shoot on their free throw percentage in college you would have missed out on a lot a great players, who I won't bother to list. Free throw percentage is nothing more than an indicator. But there are other indicators as well that are equally important. I look at a players form. I look at a players shot selection. I look at a players competition, and how he's defended by the opposition. I look at whether his shot is effortless or not. I look at whether most of his shots (at least 90 plus percent) are on line. I look at whether he has the proper rotation on the ball. Is he the best player on the team and being asked to carry more of the offensive load than should be asked?

When I look at Achiuwa, and I see the tremendous effort he puts out on the defensive end, which certainly affects his effort on the offensive end, and I take all those other items I mentioned into consideration, I see a player with tremendous potential. I'm not sure who is calling him a tweener? I haven't heard that, and in today's league, at 6'9" and with a 7'2" wingspan you would would hardly be called undersized at the PF position. He's a great athlete, and as I previously said, if he can become a consistent outside shooter, he can play the three.

Several of the scouts I know have compared Achiuwa to another player that coming out of college was very similar. Pascal Siakam, who was the 27th pick in the draft. Who shot 20.0% from the three his last year at New Mexico and 67% from the free throw line. Pascal is 6'9" and 230 Lbs with a large wingspan, and a great athlete. What set him apart was his desire, hustle, his defense and rebounding. Sound familiar?

His rookie year Pascal shot 20% from the 3 pt line, and 68% from the free throw line. This past season, his 4th, he shot 35.9% from the three and 80% from the free throw line. So the idea that you judge players by some stats they put up in college is pure nonsense. I'm not saying that Achiuwa is the next Pascal, but I'am saying that if you used your standards of judging a player, you would have missed out on him. I believe what my eye's tell me, not some stupid stat sheet. All stats do for me, is occasionally confirm what my eye's tell me. But when they conflict with one another, especially with a 19 year old player, I'll go with my eye's.

Finally, when I say that Achiuwa is mostly potential at the moment, I'm referring to his perceived ceiling, meaning I think he as a fairly high floor. He has some holes in his game right now. His handles need to improve, as does his jumpshot. He has fairly good court vision, but his execution based off that court vision needs work, which will cut down on his turnovers. He's an explosive athlete, but doesn't have any signature off the dribble moves to use that athleticism. A wicked crossover with a step back would help.

This is a kid that at age 14, with little experience, started on his varsity high school team. All these things matter when looking at a player.
Yeah, college stats are college stats. And to be honest, stats in this era of the NBA don't mean a whole lot. In the right role Brad Miller would probably be a nightly 20-25 and 10 these days. I've been watching a ton of games from the 70's-early 2000's the last couple of months. This era is a lot more like the late 60's/early 70's. It was a skilled league and shooting ability is what allowed teams like the Knicks to make up the difference on a two headed monster of West and Wilt. I think at some point that wheel is going to come back around and it will belong to the Alphas like it did in the 90's. The NBA's push of Zion might be the start of it.
 
I believe in picking the best player available and that doesn't always equate to the player with the best upside. Most would say that Anthony Edwards has the highest upside in this draft, and most of those same scouts would also say that he has the biggest bust potential in the draft as well. The Kings are in a position where they can't afford to take a chance on pure potential, especially when there are players that are more proven and safer picks. I should also point out that safe doesn't always mean less talent, it just means the players development is further along. You have a better chance of knowing what your getting.

Bey isn't the only player that I would take at 12, but Williams isn't one of them. Doesn't mean I don't like him, but I'll tell you right now, that if I were to make a small reach I would take Achiuwa over Williams. Just my humble opinion. Just like I would take his teammate Vassell over him. But hey, if the Kings take Williams, I'll be his biggest fan..

As far Precious being a small ball five, I'm sure he could play the position in certain matchups. But he's solid at the four, and as I said, if he can become a little more consistent with his 3 pt shot, he could easily play the three. He gets up and down the floor with the best of him and I could see him running along side Fox. If you put him at the four then you lock in Bagley at the five. Achiuwa's defense is outstanding. Terrific lateral quickness along with great instincts.

I know a lot of mocks are in love with Okongwu from USC, but if I'm looking for a big man, I would take Achiuwa over Okongwu. I love Okongwu's hustle and defense, but I think Achiuwa's defense is as good or better, and he actually has game away from the basket. Right now, Okongwu is strictly a post guy, and I'm not sure how well that will work in the NBA where he'll be going up against bigger players. But hey, what do I know.

I'll tell you who the sleeper is in this draft and that Cole Anthony. He was downright terrible at North Carolina this year, but then, NC was a very bad team. As I re-watched a couple of their games it was obvious that Anthony was double teamed more often than not, resulting in his taking a lot of bad shots. So the question is, is he really that bad, or was it a result of being on a very bad team? He was one of the highest ranked players coming out of highschool. Did he suddenly forget how to play? Is he a player where you ignore this past season and draft him anyway. Maybe you get a star. Or not.....
Right now, I wouldn't touch McDaniels with a ten foot pole, and I was extremely high on him coming into this season. Is he talented? Yes, but I question his BBIQ and his desire. He reminds me of his brother, which isn't a compliment. I wish him well, but on another team. As a comparison, if I were able to pit McDaniels one on one against Achiuwa, Precious would destroy him on both ends of the court.

I know your a big stat guy, but I'm not, and let me explain that. About 85% of my judgement is based on what I see with my own eye's, and I've seldom been wrong. I put about 15% of my judgement on stats. The reason is, my eye and my brain can tell me things that stats never can. Stats are fixed in time. A missed shot will always remain a missed shot, and if you judge a player on that moment in time, then your a fool (I'm generalizing). Point is, were talking about players that most times are 18 or 19 years old.

In Achiuwa's case, he didn't start playing until the 8th grade. He didn't get serious instruction until highschool, and then college. So he came to the game a bit late, which I have to take into consideration, unlike a player like McDaniels who was likely playing BB when he was 5 years old. So I look at the growth rate of both players, and I move Achiuwa ahead of McDaniels. You give consideration to McDaniels, who shot 33% from the three, but disparage Achiuwa who shot 32.5% from the three. Really? Simply because of McDaniels free throw percentage?

If you judged every players ability to shoot on their free throw percentage in college you would have missed out on a lot a great players, who I won't bother to list. Free throw percentage is nothing more than an indicator. But there are other indicators as well that are equally important. I look at a players form. I look at a players shot selection. I look at a players competition, and how he's defended by the opposition. I look at whether his shot is effortless or not. I look at whether most of his shots (at least 90 plus percent) are on line. I look at whether he has the proper rotation on the ball. Is he the best player on the team and being asked to carry more of the offensive load than should be asked?

When I look at Achiuwa, and I see the tremendous effort he puts out on the defensive end, which certainly affects his effort on the offensive end, and I take all those other items I mentioned into consideration, I see a player with tremendous potential. I'm not sure who is calling him a tweener? I haven't heard that, and in today's league, at 6'9" and with a 7'2" wingspan you would would hardly be called undersized at the PF position. He's a great athlete, and as I previously said, if he can become a consistent outside shooter, he can play the three.

Several of the scouts I know have compared Achiuwa to another player that coming out of college was very similar. Pascal Siakam, who was the 27th pick in the draft. Who shot 20.0% from the three his last year at New Mexico and 67% from the free throw line. Pascal is 6'9" and 230 Lbs with a large wingspan, and a great athlete. What set him apart was his desire, hustle, his defense and rebounding. Sound familiar?

His rookie year Pascal shot 20% from the 3 pt line, and 68% from the free throw line. This past season, his 4th, he shot 35.9% from the three and 80% from the free throw line. So the idea that you judge players by some stats they put up in college is pure nonsense. I'm not saying that Achiuwa is the next Pascal, but I'am saying that if you used your standards of judging a player, you would have missed out on him. I believe what my eye's tell me, not some stupid stat sheet. All stats do for me, is occasionally confirm what my eye's tell me. But when they conflict with one another, especially with a 19 year old player, I'll go with my eye's.

Finally, when I say that Achiuwa is mostly potential at the moment, I'm referring to his perceived ceiling, meaning I think he as a fairly high floor. He has some holes in his game right now. His handles need to improve, as does his jumpshot. He has fairly good court vision, but his execution based off that court vision needs work, which will cut down on his turnovers. He's an explosive athlete, but doesn't have any signature off the dribble moves to use that athleticism. A wicked crossover with a step back would help.

This is a kid that at age 14, with little experience, started on his varsity high school team. All these things matter when looking at a player.
I respect your opinion but we just disagree on Achiuwa. Studies have shown free throw percentage is the best predictor of pro shooting ability. That is why I weigh that number.

Compare Williams and Achiuwa. Both shot .320 ish from 3. But Williams shot .838 from the line and Achiuwa shot .599. His lower body form is poor.
 
I believe in picking the best player available and that doesn't always equate to the player with the best upside. Most would say that Anthony Edwards has the highest upside in this draft, and most of those same scouts would also say that he has the biggest bust potential in the draft as well. The Kings are in a position where they can't afford to take a chance on pure potential, especially when there are players that are more proven and safer picks. I should also point out that safe doesn't always mean less talent, it just means the players development is further along. You have a better chance of knowing what your getting.

Bey isn't the only player that I would take at 12, but Williams isn't one of them. Doesn't mean I don't like him, but I'll tell you right now, that if I were to make a small reach I would take Achiuwa over Williams. Just my humble opinion. Just like I would take his teammate Vassell over him. But hey, if the Kings take Williams, I'll be his biggest fan..

As far Precious being a small ball five, I'm sure he could play the position in certain matchups. But he's solid at the four, and as I said, if he can become a little more consistent with his 3 pt shot, he could easily play the three. He gets up and down the floor with the best of him and I could see him running along side Fox. If you put him at the four then you lock in Bagley at the five. Achiuwa's defense is outstanding. Terrific lateral quickness along with great instincts.

I know a lot of mocks are in love with Okongwu from USC, but if I'm looking for a big man, I would take Achiuwa over Okongwu. I love Okongwu's hustle and defense, but I think Achiuwa's defense is as good or better, and he actually has game away from the basket. Right now, Okongwu is strictly a post guy, and I'm not sure how well that will work in the NBA where he'll be going up against bigger players. But hey, what do I know.

I'll tell you who the sleeper is in this draft and that Cole Anthony. He was downright terrible at North Carolina this year, but then, NC was a very bad team. As I re-watched a couple of their games it was obvious that Anthony was double teamed more often than not, resulting in his taking a lot of bad shots. So the question is, is he really that bad, or was it a result of being on a very bad team? He was one of the highest ranked players coming out of highschool. Did he suddenly forget how to play? Is he a player where you ignore this past season and draft him anyway. Maybe you get a star. Or not.....
Right now, I wouldn't touch McDaniels with a ten foot pole, and I was extremely high on him coming into this season. Is he talented? Yes, but I question his BBIQ and his desire. He reminds me of his brother, which isn't a compliment. I wish him well, but on another team. As a comparison, if I were able to pit McDaniels one on one against Achiuwa, Precious would destroy him on both ends of the court.

I know your a big stat guy, but I'm not, and let me explain that. About 85% of my judgement is based on what I see with my own eye's, and I've seldom been wrong. I put about 15% of my judgement on stats. The reason is, my eye and my brain can tell me things that stats never can. Stats are fixed in time. A missed shot will always remain a missed shot, and if you judge a player on that moment in time, then your a fool (I'm generalizing). Point is, were talking about players that most times are 18 or 19 years old.

In Achiuwa's case, he didn't start playing until the 8th grade. He didn't get serious instruction until highschool, and then college. So he came to the game a bit late, which I have to take into consideration, unlike a player like McDaniels who was likely playing BB when he was 5 years old. So I look at the growth rate of both players, and I move Achiuwa ahead of McDaniels. You give consideration to McDaniels, who shot 33% from the three, but disparage Achiuwa who shot 32.5% from the three. Really? Simply because of McDaniels free throw percentage?

If you judged every players ability to shoot on their free throw percentage in college you would have missed out on a lot a great players, who I won't bother to list. Free throw percentage is nothing more than an indicator. But there are other indicators as well that are equally important. I look at a players form. I look at a players shot selection. I look at a players competition, and how he's defended by the opposition. I look at whether his shot is effortless or not. I look at whether most of his shots (at least 90 plus percent) are on line. I look at whether he has the proper rotation on the ball. Is he the best player on the team and being asked to carry more of the offensive load than should be asked?

When I look at Achiuwa, and I see the tremendous effort he puts out on the defensive end, which certainly affects his effort on the offensive end, and I take all those other items I mentioned into consideration, I see a player with tremendous potential. I'm not sure who is calling him a tweener? I haven't heard that, and in today's league, at 6'9" and with a 7'2" wingspan you would would hardly be called undersized at the PF position. He's a great athlete, and as I previously said, if he can become a consistent outside shooter, he can play the three.

Several of the scouts I know have compared Achiuwa to another player that coming out of college was very similar. Pascal Siakam, who was the 27th pick in the draft. Who shot 20.0% from the three his last year at New Mexico and 67% from the free throw line. Pascal is 6'9" and 230 Lbs with a large wingspan, and a great athlete. What set him apart was his desire, hustle, his defense and rebounding. Sound familiar?

His rookie year Pascal shot 20% from the 3 pt line, and 68% from the free throw line. This past season, his 4th, he shot 35.9% from the three and 80% from the free throw line. So the idea that you judge players by some stats they put up in college is pure nonsense. I'm not saying that Achiuwa is the next Pascal, but I'am saying that if you used your standards of judging a player, you would have missed out on him. I believe what my eye's tell me, not some stupid stat sheet. All stats do for me, is occasionally confirm what my eye's tell me. But when they conflict with one another, especially with a 19 year old player, I'll go with my eye's.

Finally, when I say that Achiuwa is mostly potential at the moment, I'm referring to his perceived ceiling, meaning I think he as a fairly high floor. He has some holes in his game right now. His handles need to improve, as does his jumpshot. He has fairly good court vision, but his execution based off that court vision needs work, which will cut down on his turnovers. He's an explosive athlete, but doesn't have any signature off the dribble moves to use that athleticism. A wicked crossover with a step back would help.

This is a kid that at age 14, with little experience, started on his varsity high school team. All these things matter when looking at a player.
I respect your opinion but we just disagree on Achiuwa. Studies have shown free throw percentage is the best predictor of pro shooting ability. That is why I weigh that number.

Compare Williams and Achiuwa. Both shot .320 ish from 3. But Williams shot .838 from the line and Achiuwa shot .599. IMHO, Achiuwa is a small ball 5 and we have one already.
 
I respect your opinion but we just disagree on Achiuwa. Studies have shown free throw percentage is the best predictor of pro shooting ability. That is why I weigh that number.

Compare Williams and Achiuwa. Both shot .320 ish from 3. But Williams shot .838 from the line and Achiuwa shot .599. IMHO, Achiuwa is a small ball 5 and we have one already.
Williams FT% in high school was 72.8% and 76.2% his senior year. Yes, he shot 83.8% from the FT line this year, but he only had 74 FTAs. That’s not a massive sample size.

I’d much rather have Williams than Achiuwa as well, but thought I would bring some other data to the table. I’m not as confident in his strong FT% as you are due to the points raise above.
 
Williams FT% in high school was 72.8% and 76.2% his senior year. Yes, he shot 83.8% from the FT line this year, but he only had 74 FTAs. That’s not a massive sample size.

I’d much rather have Williams than Achiuwa as well, but thought I would bring some other data to the table. I’m not as confident in his strong FT% as you are due to the points raise above.
72.8 and 76.2 are not horrible percentages. Nesmith shot .825 and Bey shot .769 and Vassell shot .738. But I agree on the sample size comments.

If Achiuwa had that percent I would feel much better his shooting. His form with his lower body is also a bit funky.
 

bajaden

Hall of Famer
72.8 and 76.2 are not horrible percentages. Nesmith shot .825 and Bey shot .769 and Vassell shot .738. But I agree on the sample size comments.

If Achiuwa had that percent I would feel much better his shooting. His form with his lower body is also a bit funky.
As stated previously, Achiuwa came to the game a little late, and if you've watched any high school basketball, unless it's at one of those basketball academies, the development can leave something to be desired. So once in the NBA, those little things that contribute to poor free throw shooting can or will be corrected.

I don't have the time to go and look up who is and who is not a good free throw shooter, and how that does or does not relate to that players 3 pt shot. But to some degree, it's subjective, and many times, it a fluctuating stat. Obviously, there are exceptions to the rule, like Rubio, who is a great free throw shooter, but not so good from the three. Here's a question for you. If a college player is a good free throw shooter, but a poor 3 pt shooter, do you believe his 3 pt shot will automatically improve once in the NBA? And if so, then why can't a players free throw shot improve as well?

Look, Achiuwa isn't my first choice, but I wouldn't be disappointed if he became the choice. I was merely looking at players that would be considered a bit of a reach at 12 and trying to educate people as to who they were, and what they might bring to the table. I would throw Williams into the group. Another reach player I really like, and who might be the best PG in this class, is Kira Lewis. The only knock on Lewis is the fact that while he's 6'3" and has a 6'6" wingspan, he only weighs 165 Lbs.

Despite that, he's a very good rebounder (4.8 per game), and a very good defender averaging 1.8 steals a game. But despite being a terrific defender with great lateral quickness and instincts, he'll definitely struggle fighting through picks at the NBA level until he gets stronger. But if the Kings are looking for their back up point guard of the future to replace Corey Joseph, he wouldn't be a bad choice. And, are you paying attention, he shot 80,2% from the free throw line, along with 36.6% from the three. He also averaged 4.8 assists a game. His quickness will remind you of Fox.

 
As stated previously, Achiuwa came to the game a little late, and if you've watched any high school basketball, unless it's at one of those basketball academies, the development can leave something to be desired. So once in the NBA, those little things that contribute to poor free throw shooting can or will be corrected.

I don't have the time to go and look up who is and who is not a good free throw shooter, and how that does or does not relate to that players 3 pt shot. But to some degree, it's subjective, and many times, it a fluctuating stat. Obviously, there are exceptions to the rule, like Rubio, who is a great free throw shooter, but not so good from the three. Here's a question for you. If a college player is a good free throw shooter, but a poor 3 pt shooter, do you believe his 3 pt shot will automatically improve once in the NBA? And if so, then why can't a players free throw shot improve as well?

Look, Achiuwa isn't my first choice, but I wouldn't be disappointed if he became the choice. I was merely looking at players that would be considered a bit of a reach at 12 and trying to educate people as to who they were, and what they might bring to the table. I would throw Williams into the group. Another reach player I really like, and who might be the best PG in this class, is Kira Lewis. The only knock on Lewis is the fact that while he's 6'3" and has a 6'6" wingspan, he only weighs 165 Lbs.

Despite that, he's a very good rebounder (4.8 per game), and a very good defender averaging 1.8 steals a game. But despite being a terrific defender with great lateral quickness and instincts, he'll definitely struggle fighting through picks at the NBA level until he gets stronger. But if the Kings are looking for their back up point guard of the future to replace Corey Joseph, he wouldn't be a bad choice. And, are you paying attention, he shot 80,2% from the free throw line, along with 36.6% from the three. He also averaged 4.8 assists a game. His quickness will remind you of Fox.

I had not seen this kid before. Where is he projected to go? If he's there in the second, which I'm presuming he won't be, we should be all over him. You could hardly tell the difference between him and Fox in some of those plays, he's a blur. That type of quickness is rare, and the eye-ball test and stats are very promising (granted it's a highlight video).
 

bajaden

Hall of Famer
I had not seen this kid before. Where is he projected to go? If he's there in the second, which I'm presuming he won't be, we should be all over him. You could hardly tell the difference between him and Fox in some of those plays, he's a blur. That type of quickness is rare, and the eye-ball test and stats are very promising (granted it's a highlight video).
Most drafts having him going somewhere between 16 and 25. So he wouldn't be that much of a reach at 10, 11, or 12. He's a terrific athletic and a very good defender. I assume your referring to Lewis, and yeah, he reminds me a lot of Fox, but with a little better 3 pt shot coming out of college.
 
Most drafts having him going somewhere between 16 and 25. So he wouldn't be that much of a reach at 10, 11, or 12. He's a terrific athletic and a very good defender. I assume your referring to Lewis, and yeah, he reminds me a lot of Fox, but with a little better 3 pt shot coming out of college.
Lewis looks good. I wouldn’t pass on him because of Fox or any other Kings guard if he is the highest upside player available. Add some weight and strength and I imagine he and Fox could share some time on the court as well as backup PG.
 

bajaden

Hall of Famer
Lewis looks good. I wouldn’t pass on him because of Fox or any other Kings guard if he is the highest upside player available. Add some weight and strength and I imagine he and Fox could share some time on the court as well as backup PG.
My thought is that Joesph only has one guaranteed year left on his contract with the following year being a team option, so it the Kings are looking for their backup PG of the future, and a player who can play essentially the same game as Fox if Fox were to be injured, then Lewis might be that option.
 
72.8 and 76.2 are not horrible percentages. Nesmith shot .825 and Bey shot .769 and Vassell shot .738. But I agree on the sample size comments.

If Achiuwa had that percent I would feel much better his shooting. His form with his lower body is also a bit funky.
Went back and watched a lot of film on Achiuwa and don't see what your seeing as far as his lower body form is concerned. What I did see when I went to slow motion is that his release point isn't always consistent. There are times when he tends to shoot the ball on the way up instead of at the top of his jump. He isn't always completely squared up either, but he doesn't kick his legs out or fall away on his shot. Go back and look at film on Marcus Smart if you want to see what bad lower body form looks like.

Bottom line is that most of Achiuwa's form problems are correctable. At the free throw line he seems to suffer from the same disease that Fox suffers from. He has no set routine. Fox shoots free throws like he wants to get them over with. To be a good free throw shooter you have to have a set routine that you repeat every time. Again, correctable. Doesn't mean those problems will be corrected, but he's a known gym rat who works hard on his game, so I wouldn't bet against him.

Karl Malone was a terrible free throw shooter when he came into the league, and he had no set routine. He shot 48.1% his rookie year and 59.8% his second year. But after working hard with a shooting coach he shot over 70% the rest of his career averaging 74.2%. Olajuwon is another who improved after hard work. Of course neither of them were 3 pt shooters, but it was a different league then.
 
Call me crazy here but Kira Lewis just doesn't seem exceptionally fast for his size. Hes no doubt fast but I wouldn't put him anywhere near Fox fast.

The idea of having two Fox's is intriguing though. Lewis looks a bit slower but could make up for it since his shooting is a bit better than Fox's. Looks like he would take a few years to develop and fill out but that may be an intriguing pick.
 
Daniel Oturu: 6'10", 240 Lbs, 7'3" wingspan, PF/C, Minnesota, Soph.
33.9 mpg - 20.1 ppg - 56.3% fgp - 36.5% 3pp - 70.7% ftp - 11.3 rpg - 2.5 bpg

There's no doubt that Oturu would be quite a reach for the Kings since he's projected to go at the bottom of the first rd. Some mocks have him going at the top of the 2nd rd. Oturu is definitely 1st rd material and I have him a bit higher on my personal board, but that's based more on the potential I see. He's a very good offensive rebounder averaging around 4 a game. and shot a respectable 36.5% from the three, averaging 2 attempts a game. Amazingly he shot almost the same percentage on his mid-range jumpers, which is not very good.

In the video posted you'll notice that his form on his 3 pt shots is almost exactly the same every time, and while he does jump, it's more of a set shot, which is fine. And his shot selection is good on that shot since he's mostly open. However, if you take a close look at his mid-range jumper, his form is different almost every time. He's off balance quite a bit, and he appears to be trying to get more elevation on it. It's something he needs to work on, and it's correctable. Also in the video you notice that he seldom passes the ball once in his possession, and since I've seen him in actual games, I can tell you that he's currently not a good passer. Another area he needs to improve.

He also needs to work on his ball handling. He gets very loose with it at times, and along with his tendency to drive into traffic, the result is usually a turnover. Lastly, even though he's a very good post defender, he needs to improve his lower body strength. When going up against bigger post players like Luka Garza of Iowa, he's gets pushed around. I see his ideal playing weight at around 255 Lbs.

Now that I've gotten all the negative stuff out of the way, lets get to why I like him as a future NBA player. Number one is because of the jump he made from his freshman year, almost doubling every statistic across the board. He came to Minnesota as an athletic, but very raw player, and he looked it his freshman year. In his sophomore year he looked like an entirely different player, and was the best player on the Minnesota team. That shows he had the desire to put in the hard work necessary to improve.

He's already an excellent rebounder (11,1 per game) and has great instincts as a shot blocker (2.5 per game). He runs the floor well and he's a very good scorer around the basket with the limited post moves he has. But you can see the potential he has in that area. His lateral quickness is adequate because of his instincts, and he never lets up on a defensive play when his man gets by him. He has a drtg of 92.9 and a ortg of 115.1. That's a +22, which is outstanding. While I'm not sure how that will translate to the NBA, it's a good starting point.

His coach said that Oturu is a advent student of the game. He stated that Oturu will sometimes call him at 10 pm at night and ask him questions about NBA players like Olajuwon, and what was it that made them great. I doubt the Kings will have a shot at him unless they were to trade down, or combine a couple of 2nd rd picks to move up, or, if he were to slide down to our first pick in the 2nd rd, which is unlikely. But I thought I'd do a post on him just in case.

 
L
As stated previously, Achiuwa came to the game a little late, and if you've watched any high school basketball, unless it's at one of those basketball academies, the development can leave something to be desired. So once in the NBA, those little things that contribute to poor free throw shooting can or will be corrected.

I don't have the time to go and look up who is and who is not a good free throw shooter, and how that does or does not relate to that players 3 pt shot. But to some degree, it's subjective, and many times, it a fluctuating stat. Obviously, there are exceptions to the rule, like Rubio, who is a great free throw shooter, but not so good from the three. Here's a question for you. If a college player is a good free throw shooter, but a poor 3 pt shooter, do you believe his 3 pt shot will automatically improve once in the NBA? And if so, then why can't a players free throw shot improve as well?

Look, Achiuwa isn't my first choice, but I wouldn't be disappointed if he became the choice. I was merely looking at players that would be considered a bit of a reach at 12 and trying to educate people as to who they were, and what they might bring to the table. I would throw Williams into the group. Another reach player I really like, and who might be the best PG in this class, is Kira Lewis. The only knock on Lewis is the fact that while he's 6'3" and has a 6'6" wingspan, he only weighs 165 Lbs.

Despite that, he's a very good rebounder (4.8 per game), and a very good defender averaging 1.8 steals a game. But despite being a terrific defender with great lateral quickness and instincts, he'll definitely struggle fighting through picks at the NBA level until he gets stronger. But if the Kings are looking for their back up point guard of the future to replace Corey Joseph, he wouldn't be a bad choice. And, are you paying attention, he shot 80,2% from the free throw line, along with 36.6% from the three. He also averaged 4.8 assists a game. His quickness will remind you of Fox.

Lewis appears to have “effortless” athleticism. Very fluid.