2020 Shelter in Place Alphabet Movie Draft - BONUS ROUNDS

Um, not to rain on anyone's parade (or river raft) or anything, but the rules state:



To the best of my knowledge, this was a made-for-TV show. I think @foxfire will need to make a different pick unless someone has a reason to allow it.

Per wikipedia:

The Hobbit is a 1977 Japanese-American animated musical television special created by Rankin/Bass, a studio known for their holiday specials, and animated by Topcraft, a precursor to Studio Ghibli. The film is an adaptation of the 1937 book of the same name by J. R. R. Tolkien, and was first broadcast on NBC in the United States on Sunday, November 27, 1977.
Why is Blade Runner 2049 draft eligible after Blade Runner was already selected? Shouldn’t it be out due to using the same film series for the same letter (i.e. Star Wars)?
 
G = Good Will Hunting (1997) - R



For my senior project in high school I decided to review a list of the top 100 films of all time. #1 became the Godfather, #2 was REDACTED, and this movie moved me to place it as #3 on my 18 year old self's list. For my presentation I gave a synopsis of my project, the qualifiers for each ranking, and I showed a brief clip of my favorite scene. This was it:

Link #1

I still enjoy this film immensely. I appreciate the depth of character development. There is a painful humanity to each character, and they express this pain in the variety of their strengths, quirks, and insecurities.

Robin Williams said this about taking the role as Sean Maguire:
Robin Williams said:
What drew me to the role just was the idea of a guy trying to give back, who hadn’t been practicing in a while. Here he is, a vet with a history, with a life, an intelligent guy who admits he’s not as brilliant as the kid but who is saying, You’re brilliant but you don’t know crap about certain things. That appealed to me deeply. What can you give a kid like that? The one thing you can give him is just saying, “I can only offer you a certain point of view.” It’s almost like going though rehab and just trying to say, I know who you are, I know who you think you are. Let’s try to get down to who you are. That’s why that scene by the swan boats is so kind of basic, saying: The only thing I have to offer you is my experience if I can help you. That’s what made it very powerful for me.
Robin Williams always personifies a father figure for me, and this film allowed him to finally take home an Academy Award, for Best Supporting Actor, in that role. Written and directed by grade school friends Matt Damon, and Ben Affleck, the film also won an Oscar in 1998 for best Screen Play, and was nominated for Best Picture, Best Actress, Best Director, Best Music, and Best Original Song.

Link #2
Link #3

Quotes:
Lambeau: Most days I wish I'd never met you 'cause then I could sleep at night. I didn't have to walk around with the knowledge that there was someone like you out there. I didn't have to watch you throw it all away.

Sean: I thought about what you said to me the other day, about my painting. I stayed up half the night thinking about it. [pause] Something occurred to me. I fell into a deep, peaceful sleep, and I haven't thought about you since. You know what occurred to me? You're just a kid. You don't have the faintest idea what you're talking about. It's all right. You've never been out of Boston.

So if I asked you about art, you'd probably give me the skinny on every art book ever written. Michelangelo, you know a lot about him. Life's work, political aspirations, him and the Pope, sexual orientation, the whole works, right? But I'll bet you can't tell me what it smells like in the Sistine Chapel. You've never actually stood there and looked up at that beautiful ceiling. Seen that. If I ask you about women, you'd probably give me a syllabus about your personal favorites. You may have even been laid a few times. But you can't tell me what it feels like to wake up next to a woman and feel truly happy. You're a tough kid. And I'd ask you about war, you'd probably throw Shakespeare at me, right? "Once more into the breach, dear friends." But you've never been near one. You've never held your best friend's head in your lap, and watch him gasp his last breath looking to you for help. I'd ask you about love, you'd probably quote me a sonnet. But you've never looked at a woman and been totally vulnerable. Known someone that could level you with her eyes, feeling like God put an angel on Earth just for you. Who could rescue you from the depths of Hell. And you wouldn't know what it's like to be her angel, to have that love for her, be there forever, through anything, through cancer. And you wouldn't know about sleeping sittin' up in the hospital room for two months, holding her hand, because the doctors could see in your eyes that the terms "visiting hours" don't apply to you. You don't know about real loss, 'cause that only occurs when you've loved something more than you love yourself. And I doubt you've ever dared to love anybody that much.

I look at you. I don't see an intelligent, confident man. I see a cocky, scared crapless kid. But you're a genius, Will. No one denies that. No one could possibly understand the depths of you. But you presume to know everything about me because you saw a painting of mine. You ripped my ****in' life apart. You're an orphan, right? [Will nods] Do you think I'd know the first thing about how hard your life has been, how you feel, who you are, 'cause I read Oliver Twist? Does that encapsulate you? Personally, I don't give a crap about all that, because you know what, I can't learn anything from you I can't read in some ****in' book. Unless you want to talk about you, who you are. Then I'm fascinated. I'm in. But you don't wanna do that, do you, sport? You're terrified of what you might say. Your move, chief.

Will: So, when did you know, like, that she was the one for you?
Sean: October 21st, 1975.
Will: Jesus Christ. You know the ****in' date?
Sean: Oh yeah. Cus' it was game six of the World Series. Biggest game in Red Sox history.
Will: Yeah, sure
.Sean: My friends and I had, you know, slept out on the sidewalk all night to get tickets.
Will: You got tickets?
Sean: Yep. Day of the game. I was sittin' in a bar, waitin' for the game to start, and in walks this girl... Oh it was an amazing game, though. You know, bottom of the 8th Carbo ties it up at a 6-6. It went to 12. Bottom of the 12th, in stepped Carlton Fisk. Old Pudge. Steps up to the plate, you know, and he's got that weird stance.
Will: Yeah, yeah.
Sean: And BAM! He clocks it. High fly ball down the left field line! Thirty-five thousand people, on their feet, yellin' at the ball, but that's not because of Fisk. He's wavin' at the ball like a madman.
Will: Yeah, I've seen...
Sean: He's going, "Get over! Get over! Get OVER!" And then it HITS the foul pole. OH, he goes apecrap, and 35,000 fans, you know, they charge the field, you know?
Will: Yeah, and he's ****in' bowlin' police out of the way!
Sean: Goin', "God! Get out of the way! Get 'em away!" Banging people...
Will: I can't ****in' believe you had tickets to that ****in' game!
Sean: Yeah!
Will: Did you rush the field?
Sean: No, I didn't rush the ****in' field, I wasn't there.
Will: What?
Sean: No — I was in a bar havin' a drink with my future wife.
Will: You missed Pudge Fisk's homerun?
Sean: Oh yeah.
Will: To have a ****in' drink with some lady you never met?
Sean: Yeah, but you shoulda seen her. She was a stunner.
Will: I don't care if Helen of Troy walks in the room, that's game six!
Sean: Oh, Helen of Troy...
Will: Oh my God, and who are these ****in' friends of yours they let you get away with that?
Sean: Oh... They had to.
Will: W-w-w-what'd you say to them?
Sean: I just slid my ticket across the table and I said, "Sorry guys, I gotta see about a girl."
Will: I gotta go see about a girl?
Sean: Yeah.
Will: That's what you said? And they let you get away with that?
Sean: Oh yeah. They saw in my eyes that I meant it.
Will: You're kiddin' me.
Sean: No, I'm not kiddin' you, Will. That's why I'm not talkin' right now about some girl I saw at a bar twenty years ago and how I always regretted not going over and talking to her. I don't regret the 18 years I was married to Nancy. I don't regret the six years I had to give up counseling when she got sick. And I don't regret the last years when she got really sick. And I sure as hell don't regret missin' the damn game. That's regret.[pause]
Will: Wow... [smiles] Woulda been nice to catch that game, though.
Sean: [shrugs sheepishly] I didn't know Pudge was gonna hit a homer!

Sean: Do you have a soul mate?
Will: Define that.
Sean: Someone you can relate to.
Will: Chuckie.
Sean: No, Chuckie's family. He'd lie down in ****in' traffic for you. I'm talking about someone who opens things up for you.
Will: Sure, I got plenty
Sean: Well, name them.
Will: Shakespeare, Nietzsche, Frost, O'Connor, Kant, Pope, Locke...
Sean: Well that's great. They're all dead.
Will: Not to me, they're not.
Sean: You can't give back to them. You can't have a lot of dialogue with them.
Will: Not without a heater and some serious smelling salts. [laughs]
Sean: Yeah. Well, that's what I'm saying. You'll never have that kind of a relationship in a world where you're always afraid to take the first step because all you see is every negative thing 10 miles down the road.

Gerry: In 1905, there were hundreds of professors renowned for their studies of the universe, but it was a 26-year-old Swiss patent clerk doing physics in his spare time who changed the world. Can you imagine if Einstein would have given that up just so he could get drunk with his buddies in Vienna? We all would have lost something. [gestures condescendingly to the bartender] Tim would never have heard of him.
Sean: Pretty dramatic, Gerry.
Gerry: No it's not, Sean. This boy has that gift, he just doesn't have the direction for it. We can give him that.
Sean: Hey Gerry, in the 1960s there was a young man who had just graduated from the University of Michigan who was doing brilliant work in mathematics, specifically bounded harmonic functions. Then he went to Berkeley, where he was an assistant professor and showed amazing potential. Then he moved to Montana and blew the competition away.
Gerry: Yeah, so who was he?
Sean: Ted Kaczynski.
Gerry: Never heard of him.
Sean: Hey, Timmy?
Tim: Yo.
Sean Who's Ted Kaczynski?
Tim: The Unabomber.

Will: [voiceover, in a letter to Sean] Dear Sean, tell the professor sorry about the job. I had to go see about a girl.
Sean: [chuckling] Son of a *****! He stole my line!

https://m.imdb.com/title/tt0119217/?ref_=fn_al_tt_0
 
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Capt. Factorial

This Is Why We Can't Have Nice Things
Staff member
Why is Blade Runner 2049 draft eligible after Blade Runner was already selected? Shouldn’t it be out due to using the same film series for the same letter (i.e. Star Wars)?
I don't see that listed as a rule.

Of course, the same person could not take two, because they already used that letter, but another drafter is allowed to take a different film in the franchise, as far as I can tell.
 
Why is Blade Runner 2049 draft eligible after Blade Runner was already selected? Shouldn’t it be out due to using the same film series for the same letter (i.e. Star Wars)?
We aren’t picking the full series. We’re picking individual films. Blade Runner and Blade Runner 2049 are completely different films.

Star Wars: A New Hope has been taken, but nothing prevents other films in the franchise from being drafted by someone else, even if it’s using the same letter.

PS: I’m in favor of you getting to keep your Hobbit pick.
 
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Warhawk

The cake is a lie.
Staff member
PS: I’m in favor of you getting to keep your Hobbit pick.
I wasn't against the pick itself (a made for TV movie), but allowing it opens up a lot of additional options (Netflix, etc.) that isn't otherwise allowed under the current rules. It would be changing the rules mid-stream. Now, if the draft commissioner wants to add a bonus round where such choices are acceptable, that is up to them!
 
I wasn't against the pick itself (a made for TV movie), but allowing it opens up a lot of additional options (Netflix, etc.) that isn't otherwise allowed under the current rules. It would be changing the rules mid-stream. Now, if the draft commissioner wants to add a bonus round where such choices are acceptable, that is up to them!
I’m low-key in favor expanding the rules to allow such picks simply because as it stands now there are a few Academy Award Best Picture nominees not even eligible, and while I have no plans to pick any of them, that just generally seems wrong to me.
 

Capt. Factorial

This Is Why We Can't Have Nice Things
Staff member
I’m low-key in favor expanding the rules to allow such picks simply because as it stands now there are a few Academy Award Best Picture nominees not even eligible, and while I have no plans to pick any of them, that just generally seems wrong to me.
The Oscar nominee that immediately comes to mind here did in fact get a (somewhat limited) theatrical release before going straight to streaming and I would argue strongly that it fits within the rules. Off the top of my head I don't know of other nominees that were 100% streaming, but I haven't kept a close eye lately.
 
I’m low-key in favor expanding the rules to allow such picks simply because as it stands now there are a few Academy Award Best Picture nominees not even eligible, and while I have no plans to pick any of them, that just generally seems wrong to me.
I think we should stick to the original rules for now. I’m hoping to spring a surprise later though ;).
 

bajaden

Hall of Famer
For K, I'm going back to 1984 for a movie based on the true story of two journalists, one Cambodian, played by Haing S. Ngor as Dith Pran, and one American, played by Sam Waterson as Sydney Schanberg. I'm referring to The Killing Fields. The movie was directed by Roland Joffe, and also stared John Malkovich as Al Rockoff, and Julian Sands as Jon Swain. Haing S. Ngor, without any previous acting experience, won an academy award for best supporting actor. This is a gut wrenching movie that will touch every emotion you have. The movie takes place during the Vietnam war in Cambodia when the Khmer Rouge were ruthlessly taking control of the country.

In the Cambodian capital, Phnom Penh, during May 1973, the Cambodian national army wages a civil war with the communist Khmer Rouge group, a result of the Vietnam War spilling over Cambodia's borders. Dith Pran, a Cambodian journalist and interpreter for The New York Times, awaits the arrival of reporter Sydney Schanberg at the city's airport but leaves suddenly. Schanberg takes a cab to his hotel where he meets up with Al Rockoff. Pran meets Schanberg later and tells him that an incident has occurred in a town, Neak Leung; allegedly, an American B-52 has bombed the town. Schanberg and Pran go to Neak Leung where they find that the town has been bombed. Schanberg and Pran are arrested when they try to photograph the execution of two Khmer Rouge operatives. They are eventually released and Schanberg is furious when the international press corps arrives with the U.S. Army. Two years later, in 1975, the Phnom Penh embassies are evacuated in anticipation of the arrival of the Khmer Rouge. Schanberg secures evacuation for Pran, his wife and their four children. However, Pran insists on staying behind to help Schanberg. The Khmer Rouge move into the capital, ostensibly in peace. During a parade through the city, Schanberg meets Rockoff. They are later met by a detachment of the Khmer Rouge, who immediately arrest them. The group is taken through the city to a back alley where prisoners are being held and executed. Pran, unharmed because he is a Cambodian civilian, negotiates to spare the lives of his friends. They do not leave Phnom Penh, but instead retreat to the French embassy. The Khmer Rouge orders all Cambodian citizens in the embassy to be handed over. Fearing an attack from the Khmer Rouge, the ambassador complies. Knowing that Pran will be imprisoned or killed, Rockoff and fellow photographer Jon Swain of The Sunday Times try to forge a British passport for Pran, but the deception fails when the image of Pran on the passport photo fades to nothing, as they lack adequate photographic developer. Pran is turned over to the Khmer Rouge and is forced to live under their totalitarian regime.

The real journey of the movie starts here. It's filled with tragedy, and moments of joy, and truly shows man's inhumanity to man.

"Nothing to forgive Sydney"

 
Trying not to hold things up...

K is for Kill Bill vol I

View attachment 9952
Now that both Kill Bills are off the board, I can openly admit I briefly considered pulling a fast one and picking The Whole Bloody Affair, which technically does exist and has been screened in very select theaters. But because I've never personally seen it, decided that would be full on cheating.

That said, seeing Kill Bill as Tarantino originally intended, along with heavily rumored Vol. 3, is my current film-going holy grail.

Well, that and watching random sci-fi movies on mute hoping one will sync up to OK Computer.
 
For K, I'm going back to 1984 for a movie based on the true story of two journalists, one Cambodian, played by Haing S. Ngor as Dith Pran, and one American, played by Sam Waterson as Sydney Schanberg. I'm referring to The Killing Fields. The movie was directed by Roland Joffe, and also stared John Malkovich as Al Rockoff, and Julian Sands as Jon Swain. Haing S. Ngor, without any previous acting experience, won an academy award for best supporting actor. This is a gut wrenching movie that will touch every emotion you have. The movie takes place during the Vietnam war in Cambodia when the Khmer Rouge were ruthlessly taking control of the country.

In the Cambodian capital, Phnom Penh, during May 1973, the Cambodian national army wages a civil war with the communist Khmer Rouge group, a result of the Vietnam War spilling over Cambodia's borders. Dith Pran, a Cambodian journalist and interpreter for The New York Times, awaits the arrival of reporter Sydney Schanberg at the city's airport but leaves suddenly. Schanberg takes a cab to his hotel where he meets up with Al Rockoff. Pran meets Schanberg later and tells him that an incident has occurred in a town, Neak Leung; allegedly, an American B-52 has bombed the town. Schanberg and Pran go to Neak Leung where they find that the town has been bombed. Schanberg and Pran are arrested when they try to photograph the execution of two Khmer Rouge operatives. They are eventually released and Schanberg is furious when the international press corps arrives with the U.S. Army. Two years later, in 1975, the Phnom Penh embassies are evacuated in anticipation of the arrival of the Khmer Rouge. Schanberg secures evacuation for Pran, his wife and their four children. However, Pran insists on staying behind to help Schanberg. The Khmer Rouge move into the capital, ostensibly in peace. During a parade through the city, Schanberg meets Rockoff. They are later met by a detachment of the Khmer Rouge, who immediately arrest them. The group is taken through the city to a back alley where prisoners are being held and executed. Pran, unharmed because he is a Cambodian civilian, negotiates to spare the lives of his friends. They do not leave Phnom Penh, but instead retreat to the French embassy. The Khmer Rouge orders all Cambodian citizens in the embassy to be handed over. Fearing an attack from the Khmer Rouge, the ambassador complies. Knowing that Pran will be imprisoned or killed, Rockoff and fellow photographer Jon Swain of The Sunday Times try to forge a British passport for Pran, but the deception fails when the image of Pran on the passport photo fades to nothing, as they lack adequate photographic developer. Pran is turned over to the Khmer Rouge and is forced to live under their totalitarian regime.

The real journey of the movie starts here. It's filled with tragedy, and moments of joy, and truly shows man's inhumanity to man.

"Nothing to forgive Sydney"

Yours is the only list with multiple movies I haven't seen, yet all four of them (Eastern Promises, Hostiles, Jersey Boys, The Killing Fields) excite me. Eager to see what the rest of your draft looks like.
 

Capt. Factorial

This Is Why We Can't Have Nice Things
Staff member
To fill my “#” column in the alphabetical movie draft, and with my 12th-round pick I select:



12 Monkeys (1995)

Directed by Terry Gilliam

Starring Bruce Willis, Madeleine Stowe, Brad Pitt

Trailer

Terry Gilliam is one of the most visionary of today's directors, and I had at least five Gilliam movies on my short list (two already selected), but 12 Monkeys is the one that finally makes the cut. (Some people may read this and be upset at me for picking Bill and Ted, but I had my reasons.) The storyline in 12 Monkeys is based on a short film from France (I won't name it as I assume it's eligible even though it's only about a half-hour long) but Gilliam certainly puts his unique spin on it. The setup is this: In the year 2035, James Cole is a prisoner in a society that has been forced underground following a massive viral outbreak in 1996. Cole is sent back in time as a "volunteer" to investigate clues that the scientists in 2035 have about the origins of the virus involving a shadowy group known as The Army of the 12 Monkeys.

The script is tight and well written, and Brad Pitt (with the help of a slightly-off-center contact lens that gives him an amazing crazy eye) turns in one of the best frantic madman performances in memory.

Cassandra in Greek legend, you recall, was condemned to know the future but to be disbelieved when she foretold it. Hence the agony of foreknowledge combined with the impotence to do anything about it.
 

bajaden

Hall of Famer
To fill my “#” column in the alphabetical movie draft, and with my 12th-round pick I select:



12 Monkeys (1995)

Directed by Terry Gilliam

Starring Bruce Willis, Madeleine Stowe, Brad Pitt

Trailer

Terry Gilliam is one of the most visionary of today's directors, and I had at least five Gilliam movies on my short list (two already selected), but 12 Monkeys is the one that finally makes the cut. (Some people may read this and be upset at me for picking Bill and Ted, but I had my reasons.) The storyline in 12 Monkeys is based on a short film from France (I won't name it as I assume it's eligible even though it's only about a half-hour long) but Gilliam certainly puts his unique spin on it. The setup is this: In the year 2035, James Cole is a prisoner in a society that has been forced underground following a massive viral outbreak in 1996. Cole is sent back in time as a "volunteer" to investigate clues that the scientists in 2035 have about the origins of the virus involving a shadowy group known as The Army of the 12 Monkeys.

The script is tight and well written, and Brad Pitt (with the help of a slightly-off-center contact lens that gives him an amazing crazy eye) turns in one of the best frantic madman performances in memory.

Cassandra in Greek legend, you recall, was condemned to know the future but to be disbelieved when she foretold it. Hence the agony of foreknowledge combined with the impotence to do anything about it.
I loved this movie, and fortunately I wasn't on drugs when I watched it, because there were times during the movie when I thought I was. (no, I do not use drugs) I loved Brad Pitt, and Willis was good as James Cole, who somehow managed to remain sane, maybe... As a result of this movie I also watched the TV series by the same name.
 
Damn!! 12 Monkeys, too!!

:mad:;)

At this point, Capt.'s list is just full of either picks I was going to make or alternates I was going to select in lieu of my primary choices for those letters.
 
I have a thing for lists. Love reading them. Love making them. Put an inordinate amount of time carefully curating random "favorites" lists for an audience of no one. Probably why these draft games appeal to me so much.

Some time long ago I threw my next pick onto my extensive list of favorite movies, and proceeded to forget all about it. Even as the characters, scenes, and overall plot faded from memory, the only thing I could remember was I loved it ... for some reason.

When this draft started up, and my own rules eliminated most of my all-time favorites from me, I dug deeper into my back bench for some overlooked gems, and here was this movie I knew I loved, but couldn't tell anyone why.

So I watched it again for the first time in at least a decade, and suddenly remembered, along with being a superbly clever darkish romantic comedy with snappy, intelligent dialogue and a stellar performance from the ensemble cast ... it's also a film that largely celebrates making lists.

H is for ...



High Fidelity (2000)

Not generally a fan of John Cusack, but his patented awkwardly neurotic adorkable man-child shtick fits ideally into this role as an awkwardly neurotic adorkable man-child struggling to mature, clawing his way into adulthood.

The writing in both Cusack's sidebar soliloquies, and the banter between he and his coworkers / friends - arguing about the irrelevant and obsessing over the mundane - is so earnestly clever and naturally relatable the entire movie could be spent following a single day at the record store merely listening to their Top 5 debates and petty insults.

I must admit, despite his illustrious career, this is the only Stephen Frears project I've ever seen, but it's clear to me that is a massive mistake on my part.
 
I have a thing for lists. Love reading them. Love making them. Put an inordinate amount of time carefully curating random "favorites" lists for an audience of no one. Probably why these draft games appeal to me so much.

Some time long ago I threw my next pick onto my extensive list of favorite movies, and proceeded to forget all about it. Even as the characters, scenes, and overall plot faded from memory, the only thing I could remember was I loved it ... for some reason.

When this draft started up, and my own rules eliminated most of my all-time favorites from me, I dug deeper into my back bench for some overlooked gems, and here was this movie I knew I loved, but couldn't tell anyone why.

So I watched it again for the first time in at least a decade, and suddenly remembered, along with being a superbly clever darkish romantic comedy with snappy, intelligent dialogue and a stellar performance from the ensemble cast ... it's also a film that largely celebrates making lists.

H is for ...



High Fidelity (2000)

Not generally a fan of John Cusack, but his patented awkwardly neurotic adorkable man-child shtick fits ideally into this role as an awkwardly neurotic adorkable man-child struggling to mature, clawing his way into adulthood.

The writing in both Cusack's sidebar soliloquies, and the banter between he and his coworkers / friends - arguing about the irrelevant and obsessing over the mundane - is so earnestly clever and naturally relatable the entire movie could be spent following a single day at the record store merely listening to their Top 5 debates and petty insults.

I must admit, despite his illustrious career, this is the only Stephen Frears project I've ever seen, but it's clear to me that is a massive mistake on my part.
I have a soft spot for this film. My cousin is a body double for Jack Black. Same expressions, same manerisms. He is a teacher, and each year his students ask him for an autograph :). Great flick .
 
To fill my “#” column in the alphabetical movie draft, and with my 12th-round pick I select:



12 Monkeys (1995)

Directed by Terry Gilliam

Starring Bruce Willis, Madeleine Stowe, Brad Pitt

Trailer

Terry Gilliam is one of the most visionary of today's directors, and I had at least five Gilliam movies on my short list (two already selected), but 12 Monkeys is the one that finally makes the cut. (Some people may read this and be upset at me for picking Bill and Ted, but I had my reasons.) The storyline in 12 Monkeys is based on a short film from France (I won't name it as I assume it's eligible even though it's only about a half-hour long) but Gilliam certainly puts his unique spin on it. The setup is this: In the year 2035, James Cole is a prisoner in a society that has been forced underground following a massive viral outbreak in 1996. Cole is sent back in time as a "volunteer" to investigate clues that the scientists in 2035 have about the origins of the virus involving a shadowy group known as The Army of the 12 Monkeys.

The script is tight and well written, and Brad Pitt (with the help of a slightly-off-center contact lens that gives him an amazing crazy eye) turns in one of the best frantic madman performances in memory.

Cassandra in Greek legend, you recall, was condemned to know the future but to be disbelieved when she foretold it. Hence the agony of foreknowledge combined with the impotence to do anything about it.
Too close to home for the current pandemic. I always got the chills with the airport scene at the end. Nice that you chose it for # 12 selection too Capt :). Good pick!
 
For my round 12 pick, with the letter "N", I select...

North by Northwest (1959)


Director:
Alfred Hitchcock
Writer:
Ernest Lehman
Stars:
Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint, James Mason

Other than the fact that they had a plane chasing Cary Grant in a 1959 movie, what else do I have to say?

(Joking aside, I'll come back and do a write up a little later)
Lots of Alfred Hitchcock love in this draft. North by Northwest is tied for my favorite Hitchcock film :). Good N choice.
 
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I have a thing for lists. Love reading them. Love making them. Put an inordinate amount of time carefully curating random "favorites" lists for an audience of no one. Probably why these draft games appeal to me so much.

Some time long ago I threw my next pick onto my extensive list of favorite movies, and proceeded to forget all about it. Even as the characters, scenes, and overall plot faded from memory, the only thing I could remember was I loved it ... for some reason.

When this draft started up, and my own rules eliminated most of my all-time favorites from me, I dug deeper into my back bench for some overlooked gems, and here was this movie I knew I loved, but couldn't tell anyone why.

So I watched it again for the first time in at least a decade, and suddenly remembered, along with being a superbly clever darkish romantic comedy with snappy, intelligent dialogue and a stellar performance from the ensemble cast ... it's also a film that largely celebrates making lists.

H is for ...



High Fidelity (2000)

Not generally a fan of John Cusack, but his patented awkwardly neurotic adorkable man-child shtick fits ideally into this role as an awkwardly neurotic adorkable man-child struggling to mature, clawing his way into adulthood.

The writing in both Cusack's sidebar soliloquies, and the banter between he and his coworkers / friends - arguing about the irrelevant and obsessing over the mundane - is so earnestly clever and naturally relatable the entire movie could be spent following a single day at the record store merely listening to their Top 5 debates and petty insults.

I must admit, despite his illustrious career, this is the only Stephen Frears project I've ever seen, but it's clear to me that is a massive mistake on my part.
The new Hulu series based on this book/movie is actually pretty good. They flipped it so "Rob" is played by Zoe Kravitz but it's more loyal to the source material than I expected despite the gender swap. It may seem like stunt casting at first but as the series plays out, having the daughter of a rock star whose mom is in the original film play the main character ends up being pretty genius on a metatextual level, which is appropriate given how metatextual the book is. And the emotional climax of the first season definitely felt earned and hit me harder than anything in the movie (which is also great in its own way).