2020 Shelter in Place Alphabet Movie Draft - BONUS ROUNDS

So I'm stubborn. I said I would finish this out, and I intend to do that. Also, I don't like seeing our young commish hung out to dry waiting for rankings now that everyone's seemingly moved on to the bright green pastures of playoff chatter and draft talk. With that said, my apologies for dabbling in a little necromancy, but I'm going to give this a little late resurrection bump, and wrap things up as I promised to earlier, with leftovers and new recommendations.

Leftovers

The Program: A cynical sports movie where everything that can go wrong does, and even the good guys are basically awful people. Yet despite it being essentially college football gone rotten, and most famous for some kids in real life getting killed trying to mimic a stunt done in a now infamously cut scene, I find the movie consistently enjoyable. Not sure what that says about me. It's kinda like Rudy, except exceedingly bitter, cruel, misanthropic, and a lot closer to mimicking being a fan of a sports program these days. I'd totally rock an Alvin Mack jersey. Maybe Joe Kane. Heck, even Steve Lattimer. Starting Defense, Baby. Place at the table. Timberwolves till I die.


Starship Troopers: I loved this movie when I thought it was a played straight dumb fun Space Marines summer action flick. The realization that it's essentially a Hitler Youth Propaganda Simulator, and a rather spot on critique of the fascism pathos and the thought process needed to embrace such a philosophy is mind-meltingly brilliant.


Lady Bird: Inching ever closer to making my roster. I'd only seen it once the last time around, and this time it had two must-haves (Lost in Translation and Live Die Repeat) in front of it. After having seen it twice more since the last draft, my position is more solid. Pitch perfect coming-of-age comedy, with brilliant performances by Ronan and Metcalf, all centered in my own personal nostalgia for my hometown.


Baby Driver: Edgar Wright is an amazing visual storyteller AND sound and score nerd. Obviously with Scott Pilgrim vs. The World being a personal favorite of mine, I fully embrace and admire Wright's work. While not on the same god tier as Pilgrim, this one is right up there in terms of fun and energy.


Good Night, and Good Luck: A stripped to the studs expose on Edward R. Murrow's take-down of Sen. Joseph McCarthy. Ironically, test audience disapproved of the actor playing McCarthy because they said it was too over-the-top and cartoonist. Particularly interesting because it wasn't an actor; it was actual video of the real Joseph McCarthy.

"The speed of communications is wondrous to behold. It is also true that speed can multiply the distribution of information that we know to be untrue."


Thor: Ragnorok: Taika Waititi took what had been the least interesting sub-series within the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and pumped out quite possibly the best film of the bunch. Initially, there was no clear sign giving the Thor series a Guardians makeover would work; I remember the late Joel Schumacher saying he wanted to put the "comic back in comic books" when he took over the Batman series from Tim Burton, and what an unmitigated disaster that turn out to be. But in this case, the dreary and self-serious Thor needed an injection of Waitit's patented absurdist humor, playing off the comic chemistry of Hemsworth and Hiddleston, adding in Valkyrie, fun Hulk, and Korg, and letting Blanchett and Goldberg ham it up as villains. This was a calculated gamble Marvel needed to take and it paid off.


Harakiri: An anti-samurai movie that turns all that code and honor of the samurai on its head, showcasing it for all to see as a fraud. Also really cynical and fairly depressing, but really fun to watch as a revenge epic.


Moneyball / Draft Day: Similarly to what draws me to The Big Short, and sports in general I suppose, I really enjoy the art of economics, and evaluating, bartering, negotiating, and trading assets and goods. Both of these scratch that itch, even though Moneyball is a far superior movie, is centered around my favorite MLB team, doesn't suffer an excessive abundance of silly subplots, and isn't boiled down to little more than armchair GM wish-fulfillment*. I'm still searching for my perfect Sports GM film, but these are both building blocks toward it. Some mix of Moneyball, Draft Day, The Big Short, Jerry Maguire, and Glengarry Glen Ross may be made one day for an audience of me. We'll see.


Audrey Hepburn Movies: How to Steal a Million, Two for the Road, Roman Holiday, and Sabrina are all still floating on the lower rungs of my want list. The three I've chosen already have taken their respective spots on the medal podium, but these ones came across the finish line tied for fourth.


Six-String Samurai: This is the most weirdly awesome and awesomely weird cult B-flick films I've ever had the pleasure to enjoy. Alternate history US nuked in the 50s by the Soviets. Last remaining spot of civilization is Lost Vegas, where Elvis is declared King. Elvis reigns supreme for decades in the rock-and-roll future utopia oasis of Vegas until his death 40 years later. That's when the call goes out over the Wolfman Jack voiced airwaves to all the guitar-wielding swordsmen roaming the wastelands to come to Vegas so one can be declared the new king.

This is a samurai/western epic, mixed with post-apocalyptic science fiction fantasy, fused with 50s retro-futurism cultural satire and red scare paranoia, laced with allusions to the book of Revelations and the Wizard of Oz. Mind blown yet?

Cult movie myth and legend Jeffery Falcon, in his only real starring role, is Buddy (no so subtly Buddy Holly) who is as skilled on the six-string as he is with the katana blade, venturing to Vegas to claim Elvis' throne, accompanied by an annoyingly bratty little mute kid he saved from ravagers during the opening credits, navigating through the weird and grotesques 50s themed dangers of the wastelands surrounding Vegas. He even crosses swords with the metal head embodiment of Death, complete with top hat and haircut of GNR's Slash.

I love the psychotic, psychedelic, and phantasmagoric universe of Six-String Samurai, and would be thrilled to see it expanded and explored. But as it is, all I have in the regard is this seriously bonkers movie, and the ghost of a reference in Fallout: New Vegas. Maybe one day I'll get a deeper dive into the world of the Lost Vegas wastelands. One can dream.


Bob le Flambuer: @hrdboild recommended this to me calling it a combination of two of my favorite movies: Le Samouraï and Ocean's Eleven. It proved to be a lot more than that. It gave me both illumination and validation.

Ocean's Eleven had been for decades a bit of an anomaly on my top ten list, which otherwise was populated by critically celebrated classics, or quirky and cultish personal favorites. But Ocean's Eleven seemed out of place among those. It's the very definition of mainstream success without much impact; a cultural touchstone by no means, it garnered generally positive reviews, and enough box office sales to warrant a pair of mundane sequels and a spin-off. But there isn't really a "fandom" for it, or anything to warrant special note or memory beyond its own generation. It's just kinda there. A "Rich Man's Sneakers" as it were. Even the original Rat Pack Ocean's 11 is little more than an excuse for Sinatra, Martin, Davis Jr. and the crew to romp around Vegas for few months. I loved Soderbergh’s Ocean’s Eleven, but couldn't find substance to build on any aspect of the IP and franchise. Why did this movie mean so much to me?

And then I watched Bob le Flambuer, and at last saw the blueprints for Soderbergh's Ocean's Eleven in person. Bob le Flambuer (Bob the Gambler) existed somewhere between myth and rumor in the late 50s, as people would whisper about this exciting new movie Jean-Paul Melville financed himself and put together scraping the streets for actors and equipment for a passion project that spit in the face of traditional film-making techniques and values. It bombed in Paris theaters, but found new life in bootlegs, and if only you could track down a mythical copy, it'd change the way you looked at movies.

This was the unofficial first volley of the French New Wave, and even watching it a half century later, you can just feel the electric undercurrent of something new surging beneath the surface. The film itself isn’t nearly as exciting as the legend around it, but that legend is as much part of the experience as the plot and score, making you feel like watching it is itself an act of subversion; the way a kid in the 80s might feel tracking down a bootlegged VHS of The Thing.

The Rat Pack co-opted the casino heist plot point, and not much else, layering it with loads of Old Hollywood glam, and the was it. Then the legend lay dormant for decades except in deep film nerd circles.

Decades later, Soderbergh drudges up the bones of a legendary bootleg subversive gangster flick Bob le Flambeur, with the veneer of old school Hollywood Rat Pack swag Ocean’s 11, adding his own indie rooted crisp camera work and cold visual clarity from Sex, Lies, and Videotape, combined with his breakout success partnering with George Clooney to adapt the ultra cool, Elmore Leonard penned Out of Sight, and this is the complexly fascinating DNA of Ocean’s Eleven.

Discovering Bob le Flambeur at last made it clear the movie I refereed to as little more than a cool 2 hours of zen, had a deeper and more prodigious pedigree than I ever previously knew.
 
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Mr. S£im Citrus

Doryphore of KingsFans.com
Staff member
So I'm stubborn. I said I would finish this out, and I intend to do that. Also, I don't like seeing our young commish hung out to dry waiting for rankings now that everyone's seemingly moved on to the bright green pastures of playoff chatter and draft talk.
Sorry, but **** is ****ed up, over here. Things are finally slowing down at work, but now I've got to deal with computer problems again. My intention was to submit joint rankings for me and @VF21, but I just lost access to my portion of them.

I also lost the write-up for Black Panther, that I deadass spent three weeks working on, and had just recently updated to include a tribute to Chadwick. :mad:
 

Capt. Factorial

This Is Why We Can't Have Nice Things
Staff member
Harakiri: An anti-samurai movie that turns all that code and honor of the samurai on its head, showcasing it for all to see as a fraud. Also really cynical and farily depressing, but really fun to watch as a revenge epic.
This one was on my short list, but I didn't want to take too many Japanese films older than I am.
 
Sorry, but **** is ****ed up, over here. Things are finally slowing down at work, but now I've got to deal with computer problems again. My intention was to submit joint rankings for me and @VF21, but I just lost access to my portion of them.

I also lost the write-up for Black Panther, that I deadass spent three weeks working on, and had just recently updated to include a tribute to Chadwick. :mad:
No rush Mr. S£im Citrus. Take care of stuff first!
 
Not sure how long I can continue to keep the lights on here before I induce a full revolt, assuming I haven't already crossed that threshold, but I very much wanted to get to this post at the very least: The list of movies I've been inspired to track down thanks to you all.

I have a number of favorite movies I never would have checked out (or given a second chance) had it not been for these drafts (Scott Pilgrim vs. The World, Go, Out of Sight, Serenity). Following the last draft, while I didn't add any new favorites, all the films I tracked down because they were either directly suggested to me or popped up on someone else's list: Annihilation, Atomic Blonde, The Place Beyond the Pines, What We Do in the Shadows, Pina and Bob le Flambeur were interesting, imaginative, and in some cases inspiring. (Still chasing down In the Mood for Love; Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter ... and Spring; and The Brotherhood of the Wolf).

With that said, I'm excited for my next round of Kingsfans Presents Theater:

Sicario: You had me at Villeneuve / Deakins collaboration. Blunt, Brolin, and Del Toro are added sprinkles on that sundae.

The Name of the Rose: I'm so used to the over-saturation of Victorian Gothic or Modern Tech CSI procedural drama murder mysteries, that a Sean Connery-helmed medieval comedy immediately made my spidey-senses tingle. Now if anyone could solve the mystery as to how one might track this down ...

Hostiles: @bajaden had by far the most movies I'd neither seen nor even heard of going into the draft. My soon-to-see list from his roster is rather staggering including: The Killing Fields, Jersey Boys, The Last of the Dogmen, Eastern Promises, Quick Change, and Tears of the Sun. But it's Hostiles that takes the pole position because of the stellar cinematography from the trailers, and the intensity of any Christian Bale performance. Thanks so much baja; you schooled me on films as much as you do with your mock drafts.

The Nice Guys: Saw this previewed in theaters a couple times, and for some reason was simultaneously repulsed and intrigued. Probably because I really do despise the 70s aesthetic, but it looks so well done and legit hilarious. Clearly I'm going to have to get over myself. I'm in!

Close Encounters of the Third Kind: I'm actually rather embarrassed I haven't seen this yet. Something I shall have to remedy soon.

The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford: The story behind the making of this film sounds fascinating, yet still eclipsed by the stylistically explicit cinematography (Deakins again), and the central performances of Affleck (Casey not Ben) and Pitt.

Winter's Bone: Lawrence's star exploded in the first half of the 2010s, and seems to have quieted considerably in the back half. Regardless, she is a huge talent, and I'm eager to see her breakout performance in which this then 20-year-old unknown carried an entire film on her back.

The Longest Day: The mere scope of this film is audacious. This would be tough to pull-off today, forget about 1962. I am in awe of the pure ambition required to will this behemoth into existence. I am going to have to check this out.

Under the Skin: I had never remotely heard of this, and despite it being a horror film, I can't help but be morbidly curious. I may hate you for this @Padrino, but you got me interested on this one.

King of California: I love old maps, treasure hunts, and hidden gem indie comedies. Had never heard of this before, and now I'm supremely excited to check it out. Think it might be one my wife could get into as well, which is a huge and rarely discovered bonus.

Thanks again Kingsfans crew. I always walk away from these things feeling I gained so much inspiration and knowledge I would never find otherwise.

Here's to many more magical nights with the movies.
 

Warhawk

The cake is a lie.
Staff member
Not sure how long I can continue to keep the lights on here before I induce a full revolt, assuming I haven't already crossed that threshold, but I very much wanted to get to this post at the very least: The list of movies I've been inspired to track down thanks to you all.

...

Thanks again Kingsfans crew. I always walk away from these things feeling I gained so much inspiration and knowledge I would never find otherwise.

Here's to many more magical nights with the movies.
Same here. In fact, I was *just now* going through the next week of Dish's free movie channels setting the DVR to record some more things to watch. I've printed out the list of movies everyone selected and have highlighted about 100 movies that I will try to catch when they pop up somewhere. Eight of the ones you noted are also on my list to watch when I can!

Edit: As noted previously, I've already caught at least the following either preparing for this draft or since the draft began that I hadn't seen before (or for a few that I remember watching all the way through):

Casablanca
Gone with the Wind
Parasite
Fargo
The Bourne trilogy and Jason Bourne
12 Monkeys
Lost in Transition
Under the Skin
The Fifth Element
A Few Good Men
Easy A
 
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I still need rankings from:

KainLearn/Turgenev
Padrino
VF21/Mr. S£im Citrus
LoungeLizard
bajaden

Please send a PM/conversation to me with your favorite lists ranked #1-11. Don't include your own list. Thanks
 

Warhawk

The cake is a lie.
Staff member
I still need rankings from:

KainLearn/Turgenev
Padrino
VF21/Mr. S£im Citrus
LoungeLizard
bajaden

Please send a PM/conversation to me with your favorite lists ranked #1-11. Don't include your own list. Thanks
Padrino has said he is swamped with real-life stuff so he may not be able to go through the lists quickly to rank them. VF21 lives in an area that may be blacked out right now (or will be over the next day or two).

Frankly, I would just set a date and use what you have by then for the rankings. I would say a couple more days (or the end of the week at the latest) unless one of the drafters specifically requests more time.
 
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Not sure how long I can continue to keep the lights on here before I induce a full revolt, assuming I haven't already crossed that threshold, but I very much wanted to get to this post at the very least: The list of movies I've been inspired to track down thanks to you all.

I have a number of favorite movies I never would have checked out (or given a second chance) had it not been for these drafts (Scott Pilgrim vs. The World, Go, Out of Sight, Serenity). Following the last draft, while I didn't add any new favorites, all the films I tracked down because they were either directly suggested to me or popped up on someone else's list: Annihilation, Atomic Blonde, The Place Beyond the Pines, What We Do in the Shadows, Pina and Bob le Flambeur were interesting, imaginative, and in some cases inspiring. (Still chasing down In the Mood for Love; Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter ... and Spring; and The Brotherhood of the Wolf).

With that said, I'm excited for my next round of Kingsfans Presents Theater:

Sicario: You had me at Villeneuve / Deakins collaboration. Blunt, Brolin, and Del Toro are added sprinkles on that sundae.

The Name of the Rose: I'm so used to the over-saturation of Victorian Gothic or Modern Tech CSI procedural drama murder mysteries, that a Sean Connery-helmed medieval comedy immediately made my spidey-senses tingle. Now if anyone could solve the mystery as to how one might track this down ...

Hostiles: @bajaden had by far the most movies I'd neither seen nor even heard of going into the draft. My soon-to-see list from his roster is rather staggering including: The Killing Fields, Jersey Boys, The Last of the Dogmen, Eastern Promises, Quick Change, and Tears of the Sun. But it's Hostiles that takes the pole position because of the stellar cinematography from the trailers, and the intensity of any Christian Bale performance. Thanks so much baja; you schooled me on films as much as you do with your mock drafts.

The Nice Guys: Saw this previewed in theaters a couple times, and for some reason was simultaneously repulsed and intrigued. Probably because I really do despise the 70s aesthetic, but it looks so well done and legit hilarious. Clearly I'm going to have to get over myself. I'm in!

Close Encounters of the Third Kind: I'm actually rather embarrassed I haven't seen this yet. Something I shall have to remedy soon.

The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford: The story behind the making of this film sounds fascinating, yet still eclipsed by the stylistically explicit cinematography (Deakins again), and the central performances of Affleck (Casey not Ben) and Pitt.

Winter's Bone: Lawrence's star exploded in the first half of the 2010s, and seems to have quieted considerably in the back half. Regardless, she is a huge talent, and I'm eager to see her breakout performance in which this then 20-year-old unknown carried an entire film on her back.

The Longest Day: The mere scope of this film is audacious. This would be tough to pull-off today, forget about 1962. I am in awe of the pure ambition required to will this behemoth into existence. I am going to have to check this out.

Under the Skin: I had never remotely heard of this, and despite it being a horror film, I can't help but be morbidly curious. I may hate you for this @Padrino, but you got me interested on this one.

King of California: I love old maps, treasure hunts, and hidden gem indie comedies. Had never heard of this before, and now I'm supremely excited to check it out. Think it might be one my wife could get into as well, which is a huge and rarely discovered bonus.

Thanks again Kingsfans crew. I always walk away from these things feeling I gained so much inspiration and knowledge I would never find otherwise.

Here's to many more magical nights with the movies.
Hey Lowe,

Just popping in briefly to let you know that I'm glad you enjoyed Bob Le Flambeur and that Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring is currently streaming on Amazon Prime for free right now if you want an easy way to watch it. I haven't seen Under the Skin yet but the rest of your "To Watch" list are all movies I can confirm are worth tracking down. The Nice Guys and King of California are two of my favorite comedies of the last 15 years or so and Jennifer Lawrence is extraordinary in Winter's Bone though I'm sure seeing that movie now when she's already a movie star is going to color the experience somewhat.

This is random but because we have such similar taste I'm going to throw out another recommendation for you (and anyone else who might be interested): an early Luc Besson film called Le Dernier Combat starring Jean Reno. The post-apocalyptic genre seemed all but dead when I entered college but it has just exploded in the 21st century to the point of market saturation so I can understand if this is a hard sell, but this mostly silent black and white dark comedy is still one of the best of its kind I think. It's a real lost gem that I wish more people knew about.

Cheers!
 
Hey Lowe,

Just popping in briefly to let you know that I'm glad you enjoyed Bob Le Flambeur and that Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring is currently streaming on Amazon Prime for free right now if you want an easy way to watch it. I haven't seen Under the Skin yet but the rest of your "To Watch" list are all movies I can confirm are worth tracking down. The Nice Guys and King of California are two of my favorite comedies of the last 15 years or so and Jennifer Lawrence is extraordinary in Winter's Bone though I'm sure seeing that movie now when she's already a movie star is going to color the experience somewhat.

This is random but because we have such similar taste I'm going to throw out another recommendation for you (and anyone else who might be interested): an early Luc Besson film called Le Dernier Combat starring Jean Reno. The post-apocalyptic genre seemed all but dead when I entered college but it has just exploded in the 21st century to the point of market saturation so I can understand if this is a hard sell, but this mostly silent black and white dark comedy is still one of the best of its kind I think. It's a real lost gem that I wish more people knew about.

Cheers!
An early 80s, French, black-and-white, post-apocalyptic dark comedy with only two words of dialogue helmed by the maniac behind The Fifth Element?

 
With no sign of KainLear or Turgenev for the past 2 weeks, I think it is time to move forward with the playoffs without them...Capt. Factorial was the only member to include himself in the rankings (which I ignored, nice try...:)).

Here are the rankings from 11 of 12 participants received (lowest score is highest/best ranked):

KainLear + Turgenev (7, 8, 10, 4, 11, 8, 6, 5, 9, 4, 1) = 73 (they did not submit rankings and have one additional # to throw a wrench into things...) (1 first place vote)
Capt. Factorial (6, 6, 3, 2, 3, 7, 2, 3, 10, 3) = 45
Jack Jack (8, 4, 4, 10, 1, 6, 8, 3, 2, 10) = 56 (1 first place vote)
Löwenherz (5, 10, 9, 1, 4, 1, 2, 9, 7, 3) = 51 (2 first place votes)
Padrino (9, 11, 1, 9, 2, 3, 6, 10, 11, 4) = 66 (1 first place vote)
Warhawk (2, 3, 2, 3, 8, 3, 1, 4, 5, 2) = 33 (1 first place vote)
VF21 + Mr. S£im Citrus (10, 5, 8, 6, 9, 10, 1, 5, 6, 9) = 69 (1 first place vote)
Foxfire (3, 9, 11, 11, 7, 10, 9, 11, 2, 8) = 81
Loungelizard (1, 8, 5, 5, 5, 7, 7, 6, 8, 5) = 57 (1 first place vote)
Jespher (1, 5, 7, 7, 4, 4, 10, 1, 1, 6) = 46 (3 1st place votes)
Sluggah (4, 2, 6, 6, 2, 5, 4, 8, 9, 7) = 53
bajaden (11, 7, 9, 10, 11, 11, 8, 11, 7, 11) = 96


Therefore, the playoff seedings are as follows:

1. Warhawk = 33
2. Capt. Factorial = 45
3. Jespher = 46
4. Löwenherz = 51
5. Sluggah = 53
6. Jack Jack = 56
7. Loungelizard = 57
8. Padrino = 66
9. VF21 + Mr. S£im Citrus = 69
10. KainLear + Turgenev = 73
11. foxfire = 81
12. bajaden = 96
 
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Playoff match-ups will be posted in the morning. How long should I leave the voting up for? 3, 5, 7, + days?

My format thoughts were:

Round 1 = 1-4 = bye?

5 v 12 = Sluggah v bajaden
6 v 11 = Jack Jack v foxfire
7 v 10 = Loungelizard v KainLear + Turgenev
8 v 9 = Padrino v VF21 + Mr. S£im Citrus

Round 2 = 4 match-ups
Round 3 = 2 match-ups
Round 4 = Finals...1 match-up
 

Capt. Factorial

This Is Why We Can't Have Nice Things
Staff member
Capt. Factorial was the only member to include himself in the rankings (which I ignored, nice try...:)).
To be fair, I sent mine in before you said this:

Please send a PM/conversation to me with your favorite lists ranked #1-11. Don't include your own list. Thanks
:)

Now, I know that many who run drafts want everybody to leave out their own list, but I figure folks should have a chance to admit that they like somebody else's list more than their own, in the rare event that they might. I didn't want to leave off my own list on the off chance you might agree with that stance!
 
Tugenev sent in rankings today, therefore, the playoff seedings have changed a bit:

KainLear + Turgenev (7, 8, 10, 4, 11, 8, 6, 5, 9, 4, 1) = 73
Capt. Factorial (6, 6, 3, 2, 2, 3, 7, 2, 3, 10, 3) = 47
Jack Jack (8, 4, 4, 9, 10, 1, 6, 8, 3, 2, 10) = 65
Löwenherz (5, 10, 9, 1, 1, 4, 1, 2, 9, 7, 3) = 52
Padrino (9, 11, 1, 3, 9, 2, 3, 6, 10, 11, 4) = 69
Warhawk (2, 3, 2, 7, 3, 8, 3, 1, 4, 5, 2) = 40
VF21 + Mr. S£im Citrus (10, 5, 8, 6, 9, 10, 1, 5, 6, 9) = 69
foxfire (3, 9, 11, 8, 11, 7, 10, 9, 11, 2, 8) = 89
Loungelizard (1, 8, 5, 11, 5, 5, 7, 7, 6, 8, 5) = 68
Jespher (1, 5, 7, 6, 7, 4, 4, 10, 1, 1, 6) = 52
Sluggah (4, 2, 6, 10, 6, 2, 5, 4, 8, 9, 7) = 63
bajaden (11, 7, 9, 4, 10, 11, 11, 8, 11, 7, 11) = 100


1. Warhawk = 40 (1 1st place vote, 3 2nd place votes)
2. Capt. Factorial = 47 (3 2nd place votes)
3. Löwenherz = 52 (3 1st place votes, 1 2nd place vote)
4. Jespher = 52 (3 1st place votes)
5. Sluggah = 63 (2 2nd place votes)
6. Jack Jack = 65 (1 1st place vote, 1 2nd place vote)
7. Loungelizard = 68 (1 1st place vote)
8. Padrino = 69 (1 1st place vote, 1 2nd place vote)
9. VF21 = 69 (1 1st place vote)
10. KainLear = 73 (1 1st place vote)
11. foxfire = 89 (1 2nd place vote)
12. bajaden = 100



Round 1:
Warhawk = bye
Capt. Factorial = bye
Löwenherz = bye
Jespher = bye

5 v 12 = Sluggah v bajaden
6 v 11 = Jack Jack v foxfire
7 v 10 = Loungelizard v KainLear + Turgenev
8 v 9 = Padrino v VF21 + Mr. S£im Citrus

Edit: fixed inconsistencies in the 1st and 2nd place vote counts after the scores.
 
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Mr. S£im Citrus

Doryphore of KingsFans.com
Staff member
I would have been fine with just seeing the placement, heading into the voting rounds; I really didn't need to know that two people thought that me and @VF21's list was second-to-last.
 
Forces of Nature, and Arlington Road. Those two movies made me quit watching movies.
Wow, had about a half dozen guesses, but none of them were either of those two. I think I saw both of those, but they left absolutely zero impression on me. Makes sense they would chase you out of the theater.

My money was on Wild Wild West and Wing Commander, with a dark horse bet if you actually paid to see Simon Sez.
 
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