TDOS Cabin by the Lake Movie Draft - DRAFT COMPLETED

Ok, besides films that were not picked, I'll also skip omissions already mentioned. Still a long list:

Assault on Precinct 13 (1976) great use of sound
Contact (1997) sci fi lovers know this one.
Artificial Intelligence: AI (2001) SciFi melodrama
High Heels (1991) wierdy Almodovar, but also songs
The Mission (1986) predcessor of Dances with Wolves, Avatar
Man Friday (1975) forgot about this one, Robinson Crusoe from Friday's perspective.

The Third Man (1949) movies I couldn't mention earlier, because of the rules :)
Rebel Without a Cause (1955) list looks incomplete without James Dean as a rock history without Elvis.
Do you remember Dolly Bell? (1981) movie fans, don't skip this one.
Black Cat, White Cat (1998) Happy days on Danube.
Underground (1995) Reminds me to a moment when I had to listen a speach of Slobodan Milosivic, hiding from bombing, when decided to find a job abroad.
Dead Man (1995) I watched on tv a man daying in a boat for probably 5-10 minutes, I don't know, while the room, the flat, the 3rd floor, the building and the ground was shaking during bombing of Belgrade. I refused to hide underground and listen Milosevic's speach again.
Hair (1979) the spirit of 60s in muscal directed by recently passed away Milos Forman
Shrek (2001) I love the humor and songs
Shrek Forever After (2010) I can relate with this one
Monsters, Inc. (2001) humor again
The Bodyguard (1992) you all know this one, right? I tend to rate movie higher if a good music or great song is played there.
À bout de souffle (1960) Godard, Truffaut, Belmondo, english title: Breathless

and many more...
 
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Warhawk

The cake is a lie.
Staff member
Contributor

The Abyss (1989): The story of how this movie was made is even more compelling than the movie itself, which has its problems but is still incredibly entertaining. Ed Harris is fantastic in this and the constantly underappreciated Michael Biehn going off the deep end (no pun intended) with nukes is one of my favorite performances ever. And for all the talk of pioneering digital effects, its the miniature work here that I find particularly mesmerizing. Omitted because: I wanted a Terrence Malick movie more at #12 and a comedy at #13.
Another good movie I really enjoy. Again, a James Cameron film.

Speaking of which, have you seen Ghosts of the Abyss? It is James Cameron and Bill Paxton going in search of the Titanic with deep sea submersible rovers. Non-fiction, and very interesting.
 
With the 75th pick in the TDOS Cabin by the Lake Movie Draft, I select...

Ex Machina (2014):



Director: Alex Garland
Dir. of Photography: Rob Hardy
Writer(s): Alex Garland
Score: Geoff Barrow, Ben Salisbury
Cast: Alicia Vikander, Domhnall Gleeson, Oscar Isaac
Genre(s): Science fiction, thriller, mystery, drama
Runtime: 1 hour, 48 minutes

IMDb Entry: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0470752/?ref_=nv_sr_1

Much like Blade Runner and its sequel, Ex Machina interrogates the very soul of our species for an answer to the question of what it means to be human. It is 100% my kind of movie: smart, spare, beautiful, full of ideas, quick of wit, carefully paced, complete with a pitch perfect and non-traditional score. Domhnall Gleeson is affecting as a wide-eyed nobody drawn into a house of horrors. Alicia Vikander makes a startling yet delicate impression in her first major screen role. And Oscar Isaac turns in an absolutely stellar performance as an unexpected cross between aloof tech genius and insolent frat boy. That dude is f*cking magnetic. He's a star. He should be in everything.

Alex Garland made his directorial debut with this movie, and it's hard to argue for a stronger initial feature this side of the new millennium. Garland has such a wonderful imagination for visual presentation. I went into Ex Machina with zero expectations, and was both surprised and overjoyed to find a tight, compact, hypnotically-paced thriller with the most striking use of visual effects I’ve seen in some time. The world of possibility offered up by CGI has created a pervasive culture of “MORE IS MORE” across Hollywood, so much so that major studio productions with heavy effects budgets usually end up unintelligible from a visual standpoint. But Ex Machina offers a minimal and singular visual style and executes it flawlessly. Carefully-crafted art direction really deserves greater praise in an age of assaultive visual filmmaking.







PM sent to @Sluggah.
Being someone who doesn't watch movies all that often, this thread has offered ample inspiration. I resolved to open Netflix this weekend and see if there were some of the titles I had been intrigued by here, and sure enough this evening, there was Ex Machina. It did not disappoint. And you're right, having gone to college with some of them there is a type where "aloof tech genius and insolent frat boy" overlap and Oscar Issac absolutely nailed it.

Looking forward to checking on more titles from this thread. I may just print it out and bring it to my cabin. Even if I don't manage to see all of them, everyone's write-ups have been entertaining in their own right.
 
Another good movie I really enjoy. Again, a James Cameron film.

Speaking of which, have you seen Ghosts of the Abyss? It is James Cameron and Bill Paxton going in search of the Titanic with deep sea submersible rovers. Non-fiction, and very interesting.
Have not seen this one, will definitely check it out. Loved The Abyss with Ed Harris
 
Water world and Dances with Wolves?
I don't consider Dances with wolves to be Mad Max sequel. Water world is definitelly Mad Max on the sea. However, there is another one Mad Max like.

Dances with wolves is a kind of another Mission. Avatar is sci fi version of Dances with wolves.
 
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bajaden

Hall of Famer
Incidentally, I discussed this movie draft with my dad and he said The Great Race would have been his #1 pick. It's just a question of whether the cabin will be big enough to hold all the required Brandy. :) Oh and I actually prefer Last Crusade to Raiders just a bit. Every scene with Sean Connery in it just pops off the screen. Of course Indy's dad would be James Bond! It's too perfect. I was very tempted to pick that one up at several points in the draft just because it was still there but I had a plan to stick to.
If you like Sean Connery, a great little movie that I've seen a few hundred times is The Wind and the Lion. True story that hollywood takes a few liberties with, but it's loaded with action, great dialogue, and of course, Sean Connery. It also has a great musical score.
 
One more thing I'd like to add before I wrap up my role in the draft: as I've mentioned, there are three personally beloved movies on my list that I never would have even seen had I not learned about them in previous drafts.

This time around I've already seen roughly 75% of the movies taken, but there were still quite a few I've added to my "must-watch" list exclusively thanks to my fellow KingsFans suggestions. Specifically:

Annihilation
- I saw this heavily promoted and came away with zero interest, actually almost repelled by it. A single write-up by Padrino has managed to flip the script entirely and now it's at the top of my "watch ASAP" list. You have yourself at least one convert Padrino.

Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter ... and Spring
- Double-K and hrdboild's back-and-forth anecdotes about this film's contemplative nature was enough to convince me I'm sorely missing out on this one.

Atomic Blonde
- Rather stunned this went so early, especially considering Warhawk's clearly stated tastes and interests while so many juggernauts of that genre were still readily available. Made me stand and take notice. I'm a sucker for interesting visuals. And Fury Road gave me a new appreciation for Theron as an action star (that Aeon Flux had previously eviscerated). Bumped its status in my mind from "vaguely aware" to "cautiously intrigued."

Pina
- This sounds to be a both intimate and impassioned expose into an art I know so little about. I'm rather eager to give it a watch with the hopes of becoming enraptured by its beauty.

The Place Beyond the Pines
- I don't even remember hearing about this movie, but hrdboild's write-up leads me to believe it's something that might alter the way I view film narratives and general storytelling. Plus the screenshots offer the tease of rather stellar cinematography. I may not always love the projects to which Gosling attaches his name, but they seem to consistently be artistically ambitious and worth considering.

What We Do in the Shadows
- My sister has been raving about this movie for a while, insisting it's hilarious, randomly quoting it to me even though I have no context or reference for the joke. Seems that is something I shall have to remedy.

The Brotherhood of the Wolf
- Two members of the Jespher clan have now found cause to indirectly insist this movie I barely remember existing is worth my time. Really though, how am I to argue against that ringing endorsement for a movie based on an 18th century French legend mixed with monsters and martial arts? Consider me in.

Oh and Jespher, even though I had already watched Serenity close to a decade ago, I went back to it after your pick. It's much better than I remembered. Really enjoyed the second visit. Thanks.
 
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Warhawk

The cake is a lie.
Staff member
Contributor
One more thing I'd like to add before I wrap up my role in the draft: as I've mentioned, there are three personally beloved movies on my list that I never would have even seen had I not learned about them in previous drafts.

This time around I've already seen roughly 75% of the movies taken, but there were still quite a few I've added to my "must-watch" list exclusively thanks to my fellow KingsFans suggestions. Specifically:

Annihilation
- I saw this heavily promoted and came away with zero interest, actually almost repelled by it. A single write-up by Padrino has managed to flip the script entirely and now it's at the top of my "watch ASAP" list. You have yourself at least one convert Padrino.

Atomic Blonde
- Rather stunned this went so early, especially considering Warhawk's clearly stated tastes and interests while so many juggernauts of that genre were still readily available. Made me stand and take notice. I'm a sucker for interesting visuals. And Fury Road gave me a new appreciation for Theron as an action star (that Aeon Flux had previously eviscerated). Bumped its status in my mind from "vaguely aware" to "cautiously intrigued."

Oh and Jespher, even though I had already watched Serenity close to a decade ago, I went back to it after your pick. It's much better than I remembered. Really enjoyed the second visit. Thanks.
I didn't care nearly as much for Annihilation as Padrino did. I didn't dislike it, but I was hoping for more, and a more cohesive (for lack of a better word) movie. Padrino likes his flicks with a lot more ambiguity than I do. I still recommend watching it though.

I probably reached with Atomic Blonde, but I really just enjoy that movie. She does a great job, and the setting, music, and action pieces really just make it fun for me.

If you haven't watched Firefly, do so!
 

bajaden

Hall of Famer
I didn't care nearly as much for Annihilation as Padrino did. I didn't dislike it, but I was hoping for more, and a more cohesive (for lack of a better word) movie. Padrino likes his flicks with a lot more ambiguity than I do. I still recommend watching it though.

I probably reached with Atomic Blonde, but I really just enjoy that movie. She does a great job, and the setting, music, and action pieces really just make it fun for me.

If you haven't watched Firefly, do so!
I'm on board for Atomic Blonde. Really liked the movie, and the fight scene with her was about as realistic as you could make it. She looked like she had just been in a fight for her life afterward. Good movie with a couple of interesting twists... Annihilation was just OK for me. Like you, I think I prefer less ambiguity. I like the good guy riding off into the sunset with his girl. All the eye's dotted and tee's crossed. Real life has enough ambiguity for me.
 
Here are a few movies I like that I don't remember being taken in the draft.
Tootsie
Little Big Man
Silverado
Shop around the Corner
Sergeant York
Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
We are Soldiers
The Fifth Element
Sabrina (with Harrison Ford)
Grosse Pointe Blank
Suicide Kings
 
Someone suggested earlier (think it was Sluggah, but don't want to scroll back to check) that we post our top 12 lists going into the draft. Here's mine:

Apocalypse Now
Ran
Le Samourai
Blade Runner
Scott Pilgrim vs The World
Watchmen
Back to the Future
Seven Samurai
Blade Runner 2049
Ocean's Eleven
Casablanca
Pulp Fiction

With The Fifth Element or possibly Ghostbusters in the surprise 13th spot. I got a little spooked when half my list was gone before my second pick, so I bumped up Pilgrim, thinking it the most likely of my top five to get snatched. Otherwise, things went fairly smoothly from there.

As for movies that I strongly considered but didn't quite make the cut, that list is rather extensive. Here are just a few:

Amelie (2001): A very whimsy and very French rom-com (of sorts) about an impish young Parisian woman with a child-like naivity and overactive imagination. She sets out to become a mischievous do-gooder by tricking people close to her into being happy, and by happenstance, finds a love of her own. It's difficult to fully capture the essence of this film. Its structure is part early 00s rom-com and part children's story book. The crux of the plot is based on an intrepration of a specific Renoir painting, if that makes sense. The narrative gets a little overtly saccharine and distractingly strange, but Audrey Tautou is positively lovable as the titular Amelie, and the cinematography is otherworldly gorgeous. I skipped picking it because, up until literally today, I had only seen it once more than a decade ago and remembered liking it, but wasn't sure I still would. Now after seeing it again, this probably would have been my 14th pick.

Run Lola Run (Lola Rennt) (1998) The yin to Amelie's yang, a bold, loud, kinetic German, um, crime thriller (?) about a young Berliner woman who has 20 minutes to come up with 100,000 marks or her boyfriend is dead. You see her frantically run around the city to do this seemingly impossible task 3 times, as the clock rewinds after each attempt. 20 years later this still pulses with energy. I held off on taking it because I've drafted it before.

The Big Short (2015) A simultaneously sobering and hilarious telling of the lead-up to the '08 housing market crash and Great Recession. An All-Star cast covering in-depth and wonky financial jargon in a way a common audience can understand (including Margot Robbie in a bubble bath explaining subprime loans). Also manages to really humanize an economic crisis. Loved this movie the one time I saw it a few years ago. And that's why I didn't rush out to pick it: only saw it one time a few years ago. Still on my radar though.

Moneyball (2011) As an A's fan I admittedly come into this with a little bias, simply because its fun to see my team in the spotlight. But I honestly think I'd have affinity for the film's premise regardless of the team portrayed on screen - especially considering it strays so far from the truth anyway, it might as well be straight fiction. Far and away the best scenes are the "shop talk" between Billy Beane and totally-not-a-real-person Peter Brand. I've always enjoyed the behind the curtain peek at the wheeling and dealing GM life, and I think this is among the best films to capture that specific essence of professional sports. Ultimately, it's tough to take seriously a movie supposedly about the 2002 Oakland A's that doesn't even reference Mulder, Hudson, and Zito among other strange alterations and omissions, but its well-written witty banter is golden.

Shakespeare in Love (1998) This movie had no business winning the Oscar for best picture over Saving Private Ryan and I hated it for years out of principle. But when I finally grew up and got over such pettiness, gave it a chance and found it among the more enjoyable "rom-coms" out there. If I was going to tab a movie of that genre for my list, I've found this to be a lighthearted and entertaining one.

Sneakers (1991) Basically a "poor man's" Ocean's Eleven from a decade earlier. Ensemble cast gets together for light-hearted caper hijinks. There are a few jarringly heavy moments, especially in he middle, that throw some cold water on the fun, but otherwise it's a cool ride all the way through. This combined with Out of Sight is what I meant with recreating Ocean's Eleven in the congregate.

By the way, while I wasn't planning on taking them, I'm shocked no one picked: Braveheart, The Usual Suspects, The Last of the Mohicans, Office Space, A Few Good Men, Vertigo, Breakfast at Tiffany's, Reservoir Dogs, The Good The Bad and the Ugly among several others. This draft was full of surprises. Made it a lot of fun.
I wasn't big on Amelie because it's a little too syrupy sentimental for me, but I also haven't seen it since it came out so it deserves a second look. I love most of John-Pierre Jeunet's movies -- particularly Delicatessen (another old favorite I almost picked) and City of Lost Children. His visual style is fascinating and I really like the off-beat humor and clever use of music.

Lola Rennt is fantastic! I'm surprised Franke Potente never became a bigger star. She was in a couple Bourne movies after this and then I haven't seen her in anything else. It looks like she's doing a lot of TV series though I just don't watch a lot of those.

I did enjoy The Big Short. There's a lot of movie from the current decade that I like, and some that I like a lot, but nothing that I would consider to be an instant classic. I suppose it takes time for these movies to prove they have staying power. Case in point Moneyball -- I'm also a big Oakland A's fan and I enjoy the heck out of this movie but it does feel a little lightweight. I own it but I don't pull it off the shelf to watch very often either. (ps -- this is a great season to jump on the bandwagon everybody! They're poised to be the first team to open the season with the lowest payroll in the league and still make the playoffs)

I debated picking Vertigo too because I love movies set in San Francisco and this is one of the most iconic. The whole second act when James Stewart's private detective character spots Kim Novak in a restaurant and tries to transform her into the woman from his past who still haunts him without realizing... well you know if you've seen it. Its absolutely brilliant. You're on the edge of your seat knowing this is going to go horribly wrong and just waiting to find out how for nearly half the movie. But then I start thinking about Notorious and North by Northwest (I'm shocked this didn't get picked either) and Strangers on a Train and Rope and The 39 Steps and Rebecca and it's like, how can I pick just one?

Also since you mentioned liking Ocean's 11 so much and you're the one who sniped my favorite John Pierre Melville movie Le Samourai from me, have you seen his earlier film Bob Le Flambeur yet? It's along the same lines as Ocean's 11. A stylish, fun, fairly lightweight caper movie buoyed by some very charismatic lead performances. I'm pretty sure you would enjoy that one.

And lastly, you and Padrino talked me into finally buying a copy of Ran -- one of the few Kurosawa movies I haven't watched yet, but I plan to watch it soon. So thanks!
 
If you like Sean Connery, a great little movie that I've seen a few hundred times is The Wind and the Lion. True story that hollywood takes a few liberties with, but it's loaded with action, great dialogue, and of course, Sean Connery. It also has a great musical score.
I rented this once and was a little bewildered but I think it must have been one of those movies that I start watching too late at night and then I'm sortof half asleep so I can't follow the plot. I'll give it another try. It certainly sounds like a movie I would like a lot.
A few movies that I would recommend that I think were missed are, We Were Soldiers, A Man for all Seasons, Hamburger Hill, War and Peace, Becket, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, and Sleuth.
The Spy Who Came in From the Cold! I'll second this one. That's a great movie!
 
One more thing I'd like to add before I wrap up my role in the draft: as I've mentioned, there are three personally beloved movies on my list that I never would have even seen had I not learned about them in previous drafts.

This time around I've already seen roughly 75% of the movies taken, but there were still quite a few I've added to my "must-watch" list exclusively thanks to my fellow KingsFans suggestions. Specifically:

Annihilation
- I saw this heavily promoted and came away with zero interest, actually almost repelled by it. A single write-up by Padrino has managed to flip the script entirely and now it's at the top of my "watch ASAP" list. You have yourself at least one convert Padrino.

Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter ... and Spring
- Double-K and hrdboild's back-and-forth anecdotes about this film's contemplative nature was enough to convince me I'm sorely missing out on this one.

Atomic Blonde
- Rather stunned this went so early, especially considering Warhawk's clearly stated tastes and interests while so many juggernauts of that genre were still readily available. Made me stand and take notice. I'm a sucker for interesting visuals. And Fury Road gave me a new appreciation for Theron as an action star (that Aeon Flux had previously eviscerated). Bumped its status in my mind from "vaguely aware" to "cautiously intrigued."

Pina
- This sounds to be a both intimate and impassioned expose into an art I know so little about. I'm rather eager to give it a watch with the hopes of becoming enraptured by its beauty.

The Place Beyond the Pines
- I don't even remember hearing about this movie, but hrdboild's write-up leads me to believe it's something that might alter the way I view film narratives and general storytelling. Plus the screenshots offer the tease of rather stellar cinematography. I may not always love the projects to which Gosling attaches his name, but they seem to consistently be artistically ambitious and worth considering.

What We Do in the Shadows
- My sister has been raving about this movie for a while, insisting it's hilarious, randomly quoting it to me even though I have no context or reference for the joke. Seems that is something I shall have to remedy.

The Brotherhood of the Wolf
- Two members of the Jespher clan have now found cause to indirectly insist this movie I barely remember existing is worth my time. Really though, how am I to argue against that ringing endorsement for a movie based on an 18th century French legend mixed with monsters and martial arts? Consider me in.

Oh and Jespher, even though I had already watched Serenity close to a decade ago, I went back to it after your pick. It's much better than I remembered. Really enjoyed the second visit. Thanks.
The Brotherhood of the Wolf is certainly unique! It's trying to be like 6 different movies at once and miraculously it mostly succeeds. And it's entertaining as hell! I keep thinking that there's a movie I want it to be and it's only 90% of the way there but if you're intrigued with the premise you owe it to yourself to give it a try. The same director also adapted the Silent Hill video game (games?) into a movie and it doesn't make a whole lot of sense but it's an incredible visual trip. He also did a version of Beauty and the Beast recently with Lea Seydoux that I'm eager to see. I certainly admire his unique aesthetic. He's like a french Guillermo del Toro.
 
The Brotherhood of the Wolf is certainly unique! It's trying to be like 6 different movies at once and miraculously it mostly succeeds. And it's entertaining as hell! I keep thinking that there's a movie I want it to be and it's only 90% of the way there but if you're intrigued with the premise you owe it to yourself to give it a try. The same director also adapted the Silent Hill video game (games?) into a movie and it doesn't make a whole lot of sense but it's an incredible visual trip. He also did a version of Beauty and the Beast recently with Lea Seydoux that I'm eager to see. I certainly admire his unique aesthetic. He's like a french Guillermo del Toro.
Everything about this post is rad.
 
I wasn't big on Amelie because it's a little too syrupy sentimental for me, but I also haven't seen it since it came out so it deserves a second look. I love most of John-Pierre Jeunet's movies -- particularly Delicatessen (another old favorite I almost picked) and City of Lost Children. His visual style is fascinating and I really like the off-beat humor and clever use of music.

Lola Rennt is fantastic! I'm surprised Franke Potente never became a bigger star. She was in a couple Bourne movies after this and then I haven't seen her in anything else. It looks like she's doing a lot of TV series though I just don't watch a lot of those.

I did enjoy The Big Short. There's a lot of movie from the current decade that I like, and some that I like a lot, but nothing that I would consider to be an instant classic. I suppose it takes time for these movies to prove they have staying power. Case in point Moneyball -- I'm also a big Oakland A's fan and I enjoy the heck out of this movie but it does feel a little lightweight. I own it but I don't pull it off the shelf to watch very often either. (ps -- this is a great season to jump on the bandwagon everybody! They're poised to be the first team to open the season with the lowest payroll in the league and still make the playoffs)

I debated picking Vertigo too because I love movies set in San Francisco and this is one of the most iconic. The whole second act when James Stewart's private detective character spots Kim Novak in a restaurant and tries to transform her into the woman from his past who still haunts him without realizing... well you know if you've seen it. Its absolutely brilliant. You're on the edge of your seat knowing this is going to go horribly wrong and just waiting to find out how for nearly half the movie. But then I start thinking about Notorious and North by Northwest (I'm shocked this didn't get picked either) and Strangers on a Train and Rope and The 39 Steps and Rebecca and it's like, how can I pick just one?

Also since you mentioned liking Ocean's 11 so much and you're the one who sniped my favorite John Pierre Melville movie Le Samourai from me, have you seen his earlier film Bob Le Flambeur yet? It's along the same lines as Ocean's 11. A stylish, fun, fairly lightweight caper movie buoyed by some very charismatic lead performances. I'm pretty sure you would enjoy that one.

And lastly, you and Padrino talked me into finally buying a copy of Ran -- one of the few Kurosawa movies I haven't watched yet, but I plan to watch it soon. So thanks!
I agree with every point you made here.

Amelie is just as syrupy as you remember it. Probably requires ample space between viewings to ward off the sugar shakes. Still, if you're in the right mood, it's as soft and snuggly as a security blanket.

What floors me though is learning Jeunet's lead-up films to Amelie were Delicatessen, City of Lost Children, and Alien: Ressurection. Wow. Would never guess those four movies had anything in common, let alone the same artistic eye behind the lens.

City of Lost Children is a solid, imaginative, visually expressive movie that gave me the legit creeps. Although knowing the connection now I can see the cinematographic and ambiatic link to Amelie if I squint. Maybe Miette could be a young Amelie having a claustrophobic night terror. Can we say "shared universe?"

Haven't seen the other two, but post-apocalyptic black comedy about cannibals I wouldn't expect to hit Amelie's same sugar-and-spice sweet spot. I've seen enough of the Alien franchise to not expect warm fuzzies.

All your other paragraphs I could simply stamp "totally agree" and move on.

Haven't seen Bob Le Flambeur, but I'll add it to the list. Thanks. Anything described as a Le Samourai/Ocean's Eleven mash-up deserves my attention. I really should explore more Melville anyway.

Seriously thrilled you'll be experiencing Ran for the first time soon and that I helped make that happen. It's a Kurosawa essential - "human events as viewed from the heavens." Beautiful to look at; sometimes brutal to watch. Embrace the chaos.
 
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The only thing they have in common with each other are James Cameron and the word "Abyss" in the title. A brief synopsis is here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghosts_of_the_Abyss
That and James Cameron's great love of diving. Some of the technology in The Abyss was science-fiction at the time it was made but fact by the time he made Ghosts of the Abyss. The guy knows his tech. I have seen it but it didn't make a huge impression on me. It was presented as a spinoff of the present-day scenes in Titanic and that kind of forensic diving is interesting but they didn't really uncover anything new to add to the story. It is fun that he got Bill Paxton involved (rip :()

One thing I totally agree with Cameron about is that the world of the deep sea is as alien and unexplored as outer space and it would be cool to see more movies about that but these kinds of movies are almost impossible to make because of the budget and technical challenge involved. Spielberg said he would never make another movie in the ocean after Jaws and he didn't have to figure out how to submerge an entire set plus the cast and crew like James Cameron did. To make that movie today would cost 200 million dollars or more and who would go see it? Maybe the Bond series could try to do another Thunderball but other than that nobody is paying for another big budget diving movie.

Part of what I enjoy so much about The Abyss is the quantness of the Cold War era nuclear paranoia that backgrounds the plot. It's so specific to that time period and most of these movies play as parody today but Cameron keeps it enough in the background that it doesn't descend into cheese. And then you've got a bit of an Alien vibe with this tight-knit blue collar crew working in tight quarters and then all the stuff with the NTIs has a Close Encounters... well, it treads very close to being a ripoff in places but we'll call it loving homage. A lot of James Cameron's movies feel like chimeras with parts of different movies slapped together. They work so well though (I think) because they come from a place of genuine enthusiasm rather than cynical opportunism. It also blows my mind a bit that the fluid breathing scene with the rat was filmed for real. Why are we not breathing fluorocarbons and taking vacations in undersea megahotels right now? Maybe somebody should make that movie.
 
Maybe in a very loose interpretation. The only similarity was with the shoe.
Poor girl with good heart (Hoffman) looses shoe. Prince (the jurnalist) looks for her (him). Step sister tries to cheat (John Barber/Andy Garcia), but prince (the jurnalist) finds out who is the real Cinderella. The ending is different, but the hero still gets love and respect from the one who metters to him (his son). Almost happy end, if the hero survives lions. That's my interpretation :)