Adelman's Turn

#1
On Charley Rosen's analysis of NBA coaches:
http://msn.foxsports.com/story/3032102
Kings' cranky Adelman a top NBA coach

Charley Rosen / FOXSports.com
Posted: 3 minutes ago

Okay, so Rick Adelman's constant whining and bitching over virtually every call that goes against the Kings can be downright annoying. And if his play-by-play critiques do succeed in buying Sacramento a few short-term calls, it's also true that the league's refs feel that Adelman is "showing them up" — so the long-term result is that bang-bang calls frequently go against them in clutch situations.


Even so, Adelman's cranky (and ultimately self-defeating) bench demeanor should not detract from the fact that he's one of the best coaches in the business. The most characteristic example of Adelman's strategic genius is the Kings' open-floor offense. Most up-tempo teams initially look to fast break, but if nothing beneficial develops, they'll pull the ball back out, call a number, and move into a half-court set. Adelman's style is to flow directly from a fast break into a high-octane motion offense. Play calls are operable only after time-outs, quarter breaks, free throw attempts, and when the Kings are compelled to take the ball out of the net and move cautiously across the time line.


Assistant coach Pete Carril has rightly been credited with introducing Adelman to this perpetual-motion offense. The same gnarly, almost loveable character who coached the Princeton Tigers for as long as anybody living can recall. The same irascible, slightly misanthropic gnome who used to swear that he'd never coach in the NBA because the pros couldn't pass well enough to meet his demands. At the same time, Carril has been universally celebrated as the inventor of the so-called "Princeton offense" — move without the ball, cut, pick, and pass.

In truth, Carril learned his Xs and Os from one of the game's forgotten masters, Butch van Breda Kolff. (Yes, the same "Screaming Dutchman" who coached Bill Bradley at Princeton. Yes, the same cigar-chomping free spirit who also coached the LA Lakers and stubbornly refused to reinstate Wilt Chamberlain in the waning minutes of Game 7 of the 1968 NBA Finals, thereby enabling the Boston Celtics to cop the gold.) Way back in 1952, Carril was a senior at Lafayette when van Breda Kolff first became the Leopards' head coach. That's where Carril learned the intricacies of what van Breda Kolff modestly refers to as "the old-time game." So if Carril is Adelman's guru, then VBK is the guru's guru.

When the Kings are forced into a grind-it-out tempo, Adelman's repertoire includes a variety of splits, isolations off of staggered picks, freewheeling screen-rolls, and a series of two-man plays. On the run or slowed to a walk, scoring points is rarely a concern.

Rick Adelman gives one of his veterans, Doug Christie, some direction during a game last season. (Jesse D. Garrabrant/NBAE / GettyImages)

On defense, the Kings depend on fast hands up and down the lineup. However, they don't always hustle back on defense. Indeed, their desire to get out and go also hinders their defensive rebounding. Too many of them are so focused on scoring that they tend to leak downcourt and leave the rebounding to somebody else.

Sure, the Kings' light-footed cunning and sleight-of-hand is delightful to witness. But the cruel realities of NBA action often require brawnier skills. Like rebounding in a crowd, playing chest-to-chest interior defense, setting body-shivering picks, and committing hard fouls when appropriate. But don't blame Adelman for the Kings' pitty-patty game plan. He'll just shrug and say, "That's who we are."

In truth, every team has a front office overseer who's responsible for their team's personnel decisions. In Sacramento, the last words belong to Geoff Petrie (President of Basketball Operations), Wayne Cooper (Petrie's VP), and Jerry Reynolds (who doubles as Director of Player Personnel and TV color analyst). Adelman merely plays the cards that he's been dealt. And that's what the Kings are — as tricky and insubstantial as a game of Three-Card Monte.

Mike Bibby is a terrific spot shooter who wants to dribble right. He's more solid than clever. He's not a great finisher and traps can force him into mistakes. But Bibby has heart, and that sets him apart from his teammates.

Doug Christie is versatile and athletic at both ends of the court. His 3-point shooting has improved in recent years, plus he can post and spin, and drive (right) under control. Christie is a confident player and the team leader, but his prowess under extreme pressure has yet to be proven.

Brad Miller is strictly a hustle player and a good medium-range (read: from 17 feet) shooter. Unfortunately, he's also slow in transition, even slower moving laterally, and his screen/roll defense is unacceptable. Moreover, Miller is not the banger he appears to be.

Peja Stojakovic is a wondrous shooter during the regular season. Come playoff-time and he shoots mostly blanks.

Chris Webber is perhaps the most talented athlete on the team. Too bad he's another softie who can't hit a clutch shot to get into heaven.

Bobby Jackson can shoot and scoot, but can't make layups. In sum, while the Kings are still a dangerous outfit, unless they can find a group rate on heart transplants their reign as serious contenders for a championship is kaput. Credit Adelman for contouring a quick-‘n'-slick game plan to suit his available players. So, even though Adelman will ultimately be held responsible for the Kings' generic shortcomings by the Sacramento media, fans, and front office, the true onus lies elsewhere. Charley Rosen, former CBA coach, author of 12 books about hoops, the next one being A PIVOTAL SEASON — HOW THE 1971-72 LA LAKERS CHANGED THE NBA, is a frequent contributor to FOXSports.com.
 
#2
Elise10 said:
Bobby Jackson can shoot and scoot, but can't make layups.
:confused:

Bobby makes layups (ex. double clutch leading to the and-1) that i've only seen done by 6ft 6 allstars.

The only time I've seen him miss layups were recently last season with the injury he had.
 
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#3
Mad D said:
:confused:

Bobby makes layups (ex. double clutch leading to the and-1) that i've only seen done by 6ft 6 allstars.

The only time I've seen him miss layups were recently last season with the injury he had.
Wow, I totally agree. Has Charley Rosen ever actually seen the Kings play?
 
#5
I checked Rosen's other articles about NBA coaches and most of them go off into a tangent of bashing the teams' players :lol:
 
#6
CWebb's HOT! said:
Wow, I totally agree. Has Charley Rosen ever actually seen the Kings play?
He likes Mike..........but that probably concludes any thought of "meaningful" insight to the Kings. Especially someone who hangs on Phil Jackson like a sock does to a foot.
 
#9
SacKings384 said:
Bobby Jackson is one of the best finishers at the basket in the business, what is this guy babbling about?
word, i was thinking the same thing. other than that, the guy is kinda on the money, tho a bit harsh in most spots.
 

piksi

Hall of Famer
#10
Mad D said:
:confused:

Bobby makes layups (ex. double clutch leading to the and-1) that i've only seen done by 6ft 6 allstars.

The only time I've seen him miss layups were recently last season with the injury he had.
I assume that he is refernig to a regular season game against Minessota. That was only game that I have seen B.J. missing several lay ups in the short period of time. Whole team just flat out sucked that night. Other than that everybody misses an ocassional lay up or dunk but nothing major.

Who is that guy anyway?
 
#11
Mike Bibby is a terrific spot shooter who wants to dribble right. He's more solid than clever. He's not a great finisher and traps can force him into mistakes. But Bibby has heart, and that sets him apart from his teammates.
What do you think abt his assessment of bibby?
 
#12
His assessment of Bibby is way off, I think. Terrific spot up shooter, but he can shoot off the pick and has a nice runner, as well. He's solid and clever; maybe he doesn't have the best crossover in the business, but he hits the spots he needs to hit, whether to the right or to the left (what right-handed player doesn't want to drive right?). My impression of Mike Bibby is that he's masterful at finishing at the rim, especially for someone who's only 6'1" in shoes. Traps do cause Mike trouble, but I've seen him split his fair share of double teams, especially off of screens.

He was pretty accurate about Doug, but that's mostly because he didn't say much. He was also pretty accurate about Brad.

Peja, Peja, Peja. This is the only year that I think it could rightly be said that he shot mostly blanks in the playoffs. If anyone has his career playoff numbers (year by year, preferably) I'd like to see them. Last season, he was just fine in the playoffs. Not a world beater, but definitely not someone who 'shot mostly blanks'.

Chris, Chris, Chris. Don't know what to say. Call him soft, say he's not clutch... all of those are arguable. But I can] point to several game-winners that he's hit in the past two years, shots that no one else wanted to take or could put themselves in position to take, shots that Webber demanded. So let's be fair, please.
 
#13
Wow the last couple articles by sports writers are impressing me...oh wait. How is it possible that our national sports media can be so freaking under-informed?
 
#14
Superman said:
His assessment of Bibby is way off, I think. Terrific spot up shooter, but he can shoot off the pick and has a nice runner, as well. He's solid and clever; maybe he doesn't have the best crossover in the business, but he hits the spots he needs to hit, whether to the right or to the left (what right-handed player doesn't want to drive right?). My impression of Mike Bibby is that he's masterful at finishing at the rim, especially for someone who's only 6'1" in shoes. Traps do cause Mike trouble, but I've seen him split his fair share of double teams, especially off of screens.

He was pretty accurate about Doug, but that's mostly because he didn't say much. He was also pretty accurate about Brad.

Peja, Peja, Peja. This is the only year that I think it could rightly be said that he shot mostly blanks in the playoffs. If anyone has his career playoff numbers (year by year, preferably) I'd like to see them. Last season, he was just fine in the playoffs. Not a world beater, but definitely not someone who 'shot mostly blanks'.

Chris, Chris, Chris. Don't know what to say. Call him soft, say he's not clutch... all of those are arguable. But I can] point to several game-winners that he's hit in the past two years, shots that no one else wanted to take or could put themselves in position to take, shots that Webber demanded. So let's be fair, please.
One thing that I will point out about Webb is the only time I can remember him making meaningful shots in the post-season, which the only time it really counts, but the only time I can remember him doing that was Game 2 in 1999 against Utah when he pretty much took the team on his back and made some damn good clutch shots in crunch time. Other than that, I cant remember Webb making any big shots. His game winners have been against lousy teams, with the one exception against I think it was Indiana 2 years ago at Arco at the buzzer.
 

Bricklayer

Don't Make Me Use The Bat
Staff member
#15
Superman said:
Peja, Peja, Peja. This is the only year that I think it could rightly be said that he shot mostly blanks in the playoffs. If anyone has his career playoff numbers (year by year, preferably) I'd like to see them. Last season, he was just fine in the playoffs. Not a world beater, but definitely not someone who 'shot mostly blanks'.
Actually 2 years ago was the only year he didn't shoot blanks (playing most of your playoff games against the Mavs will help that):

'99 Reg: .378 Play: .346
'00 Reg: .448 Play: .400
'01 Reg: .470 Play: .406
'02 Reg: .484 Play: .376
'03 Reg: .481 Play: .480
'04 Reg: .480 Play: .384
------------------------
Tot:Reg: .468 Play: .413

Source: basketballreference.com

So, pretty much 1 season out of 6 where he's been better than a 40% shooter in the playoffs.
 
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#16
Circa_1985_Fan said:
One thing that I will point out about Webb is the only time I can remember him making meaningful shots in the post-season, which the only time it really counts, but the only time I can remember him doing that was Game 2 in 1999 against Utah when he pretty much took the team on his back and made some damn good clutch shots in crunch time. Other than that, I cant remember Webb making any big shots. His game winners have been against lousy teams, with the one exception against I think it was Indiana 2 years ago at Arco at the buzzer.
Do you really want your power forward taking the "game winning shot"???

I certainly don't, especially with Bibby, Jackson and sometimes Peja on the floor.
 
#17
If Charley Rosen had been either a player in the league or had coached there I'd be more inclined to respect his opinion but since he couldn't make it past the CBA before succumbing to being a "journalist" (those who criticize without realistic alternatives) and appears to have a personal bias against those who have made it I tend to discard his criticisms as "league consensus" opinion; attitudes shared by the uninformed.
 
#18
Ryle said:
Do you really want your power forward taking the "game winning shot"???

I certainly don't, especially with Bibby, Jackson and sometimes Peja on the floor.
If its the playoffs then I would rather have Webber take the last shot than Peja ;)
 
A

AriesMar27

Guest
#19
if its the playoffs, i would want anyone but peja or doug(if its a 3ball).... I'd actually prefer that brad takes the shot, no one is going to guard him....
 
#20
Did anyone else have the impression that Geoff Petrie must have once wadded up Charlie Rosen's resume and nailed a 3-pointer with it? He also seemed to have some animosity toward Pete Carrill, who, I don't believe, ever claimed personally to have invented the Princeton offense.


I'm the first Kings fan to admit that the team isn't perfect and has been disappointing at times. But to go down the entire roster and diss practically everyone on it, given the Kings' recent success, betrays someone with some bitterness toward the team. It's very easy and lazy, in my view, to tear something apart without being willing and/or able to offer something constructive.
 
#21
Elise10 said:
In truth, Carril learned his Xs and Os from one of the game's forgotten masters, Butch van Breda Kolff. (Yes, the same "Screaming Dutchman" who coached Bill Bradley at Princeton. Yes, the same cigar-chomping free spirit who also coached the LA Lakers and stubbornly refused to reinstate Wilt Chamberlain in the waning minutes of Game 7 of the 1968 NBA Finals, thereby enabling the Boston Celtics to cop the gold.) Way back in 1952, Carril was a senior at Lafayette when van Breda Kolff first became the Leopards' head coach. That's where Carril learned the intricacies of what van Breda Kolff modestly refers to as "the old-time game." So if Carril is Adelman's guru, then VBK is the guru's guru.
This asshat did not just call VBK a forgotten master. This asshat did not just do that. No...this asshat did not. No.

It was the '69 Finals, btw, asshat.