what was the last movie you watched?

Warhawk

The cake is a lie.
Staff member
I wanted to point out how criminally underrated this post is. Not only did the absolute All-Star @atxrocker pop in after years away from the board for a single post then bounce, but did so to promote quite possibly the most exciting film of the year, and potential antidote to all this Marvel malaise.

Everything Everywhere All at Once

Michelle Yeoh is an international treasure; the Meryl Streep of martial arts movies. But even that supposed complement ultimately proves reductive for Yeoh; she is so much more than a martial arts actor*. Like Streep, Yeoh has an impossibly sweeping range to believably be the only "Bond Girl" to play as Bond's equal, the beating heart of one of the few martial arts movies to break through to become an American mainstream household name, Jackie Chan's fellow Supercop, a meticulously precise geisha mentor, and the Crazy Rich Asian dragon mom who is both menacing and relatable, all with a sublime mix of sensitivity, strength and superb comedic timing. Yeoh might be the only person on the planet who could have made Everything Everywhere's ambitious and moderately insane premise work.

The fact that Yeoh can carry this film should not be a shock. However, Ke Huy Quan - who most people last saw as Short Round in Temple of Doom or Data in Goonies and hasn't been on a big screen since his child actor days more than 30 years ago - is nothing short of remarkable in his contribution as a seemingly goofy beta-male house-husband who is eventually revealed to be the hinge on which the plot turns.

The film itself defies genre classification. Seemingly a melding of martial arts, slapstick/absurdist comedy, romantic comedy, family drama, religious philosophy, artist spectacle, and superhero films, all interwoven into an immersive and maniacal whole. There is a lot of abject silliness and exposition dumps at the beginning, which slowly evolve into deeper meanings with superb payoffs as the film unfolds.

Perhaps the best example, (and hopefully vague enough to not warrant spoilers) the "villain" of the story is a hyper-aware, godlike entity who can travel the multiverse at will. As omnipotence does, the being becomes bored and begins to dabble in the absurd for entertainment, in this case, putting literally "everything" on a bagel. It's at that moment the entity spirals into nihilism, believing existence has no meaning and going on a multiversal rampage with the "bagel" resembling a zero of nothingness. Eventually, we come to understand the bagel also resembles the enso, or Zen symbol, giving new perspective to the purpose of existence by the end.

Also there's a universe where everyone has hotdogs for fingers.

This movie is overwhelming. Rarely have I dwelled on the philosophic meanings of a film that included a purple sex toy as a fighting prop. This may be simply too absurd and erratic for your tastes, and that's perfectly fine. But films like this need to be supported, otherwise the artform gets static and formulaic.

If you've at all be disapponted by blockbuster films of late, you owe it to yourself and the industry to support films like Everything Everywhere All at Once.

And see it twice.

View attachment 11187

*I just learned Yeoh supposedly has never been formally trained in martial arts, but knows enough about dance to quickly pickup the moves on set. I suppose that's the martial arts equivalent of learning lines phonetically. What a badass.
I just got this movie and have not watched it yet. Looking forward to it!
 

Warhawk

The cake is a lie.
Staff member
I watched this with my brothers a couple days ago. I knew I wouldn't like it because I generally dislike superhero movies, but I went along with it because they both wanted to see it. All 3 of us thought it was bad to awful with a baseline level of entertaining enough to endure the entire thing. To me, it suffered from what essentially all superhero movies suffer from: bad writing, illogical and inconsistent plot progression, and way too frequent "huh?"/"lol" moments. This is only like the third or fourth Marvel movie I've ever seen, so I thought i would be the only one with issues, but we all sat there for twenty minutes afterwards complaining of its flaws and saying we were glad we didn't go to a theater and pay extra money to watch it.
It definitely suffers in areas, but I knew it probably would going in and wasn’t being too critically minded while watching it. Definitely not in the top range of Marvel flicks.
 

Warhawk

The cake is a lie.
Staff member
Well No Way Home was certainly a good movie to probably close out my theater going experience for the foreseeable future (just reading the tea leaves with how this wave of the pandemic is going not sure how the theater release schedules going to be in the next couple of months).

I don’t think it was necessarily the best movie movie of the Spider-man extended franchise (that would still have to be Homecoming for me) but it might be the best Spider-Man movie of the bunch in terms of sheer spectacle while also setting up a healthy course for future Spider-Films.
I watched it again, and I think that it may be my favorite of the Spider-Man flicks. Darn good show.
 

Warhawk

The cake is a lie.
Staff member
I wanted to point out how criminally underrated this post is. Not only did the absolute All-Star @atxrocker pop in after years away from the board for a single post then bounce, but did so to promote quite possibly the most exciting film of the year, and potential antidote to all this Marvel malaise.

Everything Everywhere All at Once

Michelle Yeoh is an international treasure; the Meryl Streep of martial arts movies. But even that supposed complement ultimately proves reductive for Yeoh; she is so much more than a martial arts actor*. Like Streep, Yeoh has an impossibly sweeping range to believably be the only "Bond Girl" to play as Bond's equal, the beating heart of one of the few martial arts movies to break through to become an American mainstream household name, Jackie Chan's fellow Supercop, a meticulously precise geisha mentor, and the Crazy Rich Asian dragon mom who is both menacing and relatable, all with a sublime mix of sensitivity, strength and superb comedic timing. Yeoh might be the only person on the planet who could have made Everything Everywhere's ambitious and moderately insane premise work.

The fact that Yeoh can carry this film should not be a shock. However, Ke Huy Quan - who most people last saw as Short Round in Temple of Doom or Data in Goonies and hasn't been on a big screen since his child actor days more than 30 years ago - is nothing short of remarkable in his contribution as a seemingly goofy beta-male house-husband who is eventually revealed to be the hinge on which the plot turns.

The film itself defies genre classification. Seemingly a melding of martial arts, slapstick/absurdist comedy, romantic comedy, family drama, religious philosophy, artist spectacle, and superhero films, all interwoven into an immersive and maniacal whole. There is a lot of abject silliness and exposition dumps at the beginning, which slowly evolve into deeper meanings with superb payoffs as the film unfolds.

Perhaps the best example, (and hopefully vague enough to not warrant spoilers) the "villain" of the story is a hyper-aware, godlike entity who can travel the multiverse at will. As omnipotence does, the being becomes bored and begins to dabble in the absurd for entertainment, in this case, putting literally "everything" on a bagel. It's at that moment the entity spirals into nihilism, believing existence has no meaning and going on a multiversal rampage with the "bagel" resembling a zero of nothingness. Eventually, we come to understand the bagel also resembles the enso, or Zen symbol, giving new perspective to the purpose of existence by the end.

Also there's a universe where everyone has hotdogs for fingers.

This movie is overwhelming. Rarely have I dwelled on the philosophic meanings of a film that included a purple sex toy as a fighting prop. This may be simply too absurd and erratic for your tastes, and that's perfectly fine. But films like this need to be supported, otherwise the artform gets static and formulaic.

If you've at all be disapponted by blockbuster films of late, you owe it to yourself and the industry to support films like Everything Everywhere All at Once.

And see it twice.

View attachment 11187

*I just learned Yeoh supposedly has never been formally trained in martial arts, but knows enough about dance to quickly pickup the moves on set. I suppose that's the martial arts equivalent of learning lines phonetically. What a badass.
OK, having watched it tonight with my dad (neither one of us had any real idea what it was about other than it was a "multiverse" type movie and wasn't affiliated with any existing other film or franchise):

Agreed on Yeoh. She's great in everything. Superb job again by her.

Also agreed on Quan. Thanks for pointing all that out!

I almost didn't recognize Jamie Lee Curtis in this. She also did a fantastic job.

I am 100% with you on the bolded part. It wasn't quite my "thing" - bit too over the top at times for my taste ("absurd and erratic", you said, also very applicable). My dad didn't really care for the movie, but he did say he understood what it was doing and that sparked a good conversation about the film and life in general at our house after the flick. I told him that this movie, like some other art (or art forms), may not necessarily be right in my wheelhouse but if it can make you think or feel or prompt conversations then it has done its job. So, for that reason if nothing else, I'm glad I picked it up. A good movie, even if it wasn't quite my kind of movie due to the absurdity.
 
OK, having watched it tonight with my dad (neither one of us had any real idea what it was about other than it was a "multiverse" type movie and wasn't affiliated with any existing other film or franchise):

Agreed on Yeoh. She's great in everything. Superb job again by her.

Also agreed on Quan. Thanks for pointing all that out!

I almost didn't recognize Jamie Lee Curtis in this. She also did a fantastic job.

I am 100% with you on the bolded part. It wasn't quite my "thing" - bit too over the top at times for my taste ("absurd and erratic", you said, also very applicable). My dad didn't really care for the movie, but he did say he understood what it was doing and that sparked a good conversation about the film and life in general at our house after the flick. I told him that this movie, like some other art (or art forms), may not necessarily be right in my wheelhouse but if it can make you think or feel or prompt conversations then it has done its job. So, for that reason if nothing else, I'm glad I picked it up. A good movie, even if it wasn't quite my kind of movie due to the absurdity.
Agreed on Yeoh. She’s one of my favorites. Also, will say that although It wasn’t quite my thing, I do enjoy these types of movies. The type of movie where I have to start googling some “movies explained” afterwards.
My wife and I were told by friends to watch it, it was the best movie of the year. I just don’t know if I agree with that. I did like it but it was out there for sure. May have been more confusing than Mother!
 

Warhawk

The cake is a lie.
Staff member
Caught Cleaner (Netflix) earlier today on a whim. Nothing special - short (1 1/2 hour) police-type drama with decent acting and evolving storyline, but you can guess some of the twists.
 

Warhawk

The cake is a lie.
Staff member
If you like offbeat documentaries, check out Untold: Crimes and Penalties on Netflix. True story of a mob boss that bought a minor league hockey team for his 17 year old son to be GM.
 

Warhawk

The cake is a lie.
Staff member
Caught The Gray Man (Netflix) last night - it is a pretty decent action flick with some good one-liners - they kept a smile on my face throughout. It does suffer at times from the need to include some over-the-top action sequences and, at times, performances. The cast is good (Chris Evans, Ryan Gosling, Ana de Armas, Regé-Jean Page, Billy Bob Thornton, and Jessica Henwick). They definitely left it open for a sequel, and that has already been announced.
 

Tetsujin

The Game Thread Dude
Just watched it……damn good. Did you watch the first part of the end credits?
I'm of two minds on that. Sure I’d love a sequel but this particular set of characters probably works best as a one-off thing since we know how things are gonna end up one way or another (
the Predators end up taking the gun and giving it to Danny Glover three hundred years later and the Native Americans don't exactly come out on top of the next several centuries of North American history
).

That said, with the sheer amount of good will and praise this movie is getting, it feels like a sequel of some sort is inevitable at this point.
 

Warhawk

The cake is a lie.
Staff member
Dad wanted to go see Bullet Train, so we went to the theater this afternoon. It's a turn-off-your-brain action flick with some decent comedy in it, largely supplied by Brad Pitt who is enjoyable in this one. Lots of moving parts at first that come together at the end. A couple of nice cameos in this as well. Funny, pretty decent action bits, too many F-bombs in the first 1/3 of the movie or so (just not necessary, but thankfully they lighten up on that), a bit Tarantino-ish on the blood at times (that could have been toned down), some action sequence silliness throughout (with the train in particular). Just ignore it and enjoy the show - go for the fun and grab a bag of popcorn. Don't expect any awards though. Definitely not that kind of flick.

Watch the extra scenes in the early credits.
 
Prime has a just released 13 Lives by Ron Howard. Has Colin Farrell and Viggo Mortenson as the main stars but it’s a really good movie in regards to the Thai soccer team that was trapped in the cave. I had watched a documentary on this event and Howard adds a few things that hadn’t been in the documentary.
 
Prime has a just released 13 Lives by Ron Howard. Has Colin Farrell and Viggo Mortenson as the main stars but it’s a really good movie in regards to the Thai soccer team that was trapped in the cave. I had watched a documentary on this event and Howard adds a few things that hadn’t been in the documentary.
that’s the next one on our list to watch
We really enjoyed Prey
 
I felt obligated to see this considering I’d already gushed all over its pseudo-rival for the “best multiversal sci-fi film of the summer” crown.

More importantly though, it was on Disney+, and I didn’t have to pay to see it. I’m glad for that.

Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness

I was rooting for Wanda the whole time.

Not really for her to accomplish her goal, which was ultimately rather trite, and the exact same as Kingpin’s in Enter the Spider-verse, (so like, come on guys, you can do better). But it WAS exhilarating to watch the Scarlett Witch kick everyone’s ass for a while.

Aside from that, the whole venture felt decidedly empty, hollow, sanitized, stale. For a movie subtitled Multiverse of Madness there isn’t much of either. Honestly, Loki felt considerably grander in scope and scale, exploring a litany of time periods and dimensions, while here only 2 other realities were legitimately visited outside the half-minute montage, gap junction, and America’s memory.

And on the note of America, I was not at all impressed with her charatization here. She was essentially little more than a human MacGuffin and occasional snarker for the majority of the plot. She only became competently self-sufficient with the out-of-nowhere and illogical “believe in yourself” Strange pep talk pivot to manufacture some zero hour character growth for the former Sorcerer Supreme. That was not at all earned. Really undermined any kind of impact I was meant to feel in America taking her inevitable and necessary step toward badassery and mopping up the mess of the plot at the end.

I also audibly laughed at America’s not-comic-accurate tragic origin story. Not that I particularly care about being true to the comics, but in this case, the film’s take on America’s motivation for leaving the Utopian Parallel is really rather silly compared to what I read of her mothers’ sacrifice in the comics.

Otherwise, I struggle to fully describe why the rest of the film feels so uninspired. It’s like trying to rub out an itch instead of scratching it.

A giant eyeball-tentacle monster “Gargantos” (sadly, not actually Shuma-Gorath for licensing reasons, which would have altered the encounter and film considerably) attacks New York, and just like the non-powered residents of the Marvel Universe, I’m like … yeah, we’ve all been here before. I totally get why Dr. Palmer’s wedding party started gleefully snapping selfies and the bride became only mildly annoyed while an inter-dimensional demon rips through downtown a few hundred yards away. For them, it’s a Tuesday. And it felt that way for me as well.

The cameos and concept of the alternate reality Illuminati was cool … but was teased to death in the trailers and ultimately didn’t amount to much anyway. Some of the quips and banter between Strange and Wong (and here and there, America), are fun … but that’s the standard Marvel formula humming along in its hypnosis-inducing rhythm. The horror elements in a Marvel movie were unexpectedly refreshing … but truly little more than Raimi paying homage to far superior classics of the genre, or himself. The corpse dreamwalk was a clever touch … but threw in unexplained elements without much or any setup really just because they made cool visuals and artificially gave Palmer a reason to be there (whereas minutes before, she was literally asked to wait outside).

I suppose what frustrates me is the general lack of real ambition here. I have some disappointments with No Way Home, but it admirably set the stage for Marvel’s grandiose multiverse phase that was both comprehensible and compelling, and which Doctor Strange was supposed to fully embrace. Instead Marvel seems to still be sheepishly dipping it’s toe into the scary deep-end of experimentation.

-You wanna do a Wanda heel turn? Milk the ruse for longer than a two minute scene and make the Darkhold-corrupted Scarlet Witch absolutely terrifying, maybe even legitimately, unreasonably insane.

-Pay a few extra million to bring in Shuma-Gorath as a secondary antagonist instead of “Gargantos” as yet another mindless cannon fodder monster for a brawl in MCU Manhattan where they’ve become as common as cockroaches.

-Explore a half-dozen or so realities you have left over from the What If … series.

-Give America a sliver of control over her powers so she’s more involved, and maybe the plot becomes an inter-dimensional chase / horror film like a multiversal Terminator (that would be rad).

-Flex that acquired IP muscle and bring in some more unexpected cameos or even full-fledged characters: Specifically, I wanted Anya Taylor-Joy as Magik from the awful New Mutants movie, just to mess with heads. Or X-23 from Logan. Or X-Force characters from Deadpool. Or hey, a heroic Thanos to really put a subversive spin on the whole “you took everything from me” Endgame scene. Bonus, could have Brolin play both Thanos and Cable.

-You’re gonna call it the Multiverse of Madness, then get nuts.

Raimi got to push the boundaries ever so slightly, but not anywhere near enough to make this reach its monumental potential. This was a kid borrowing his dad’s car, but thinking he’s a rebel when he blasts Metallica on the radio and doesn’t always use his blinker.

Next time, drive it like you stole it Sam.
 
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