TDOS Cabin by the Lake Movie Draft - DRAFT COMPLETED

#31
I have a feeling a lot of tears are going to be shed before this draft is over. My choices in these drafts (all different topics) have generally been off the beaten path so to speak. I'm actually concerned with this group of draftees. I've already revised my order of preference 3 or 4 times.
I was going to try to negotiate my participation in this draft as contingent on me being awarded carte blanche to select my 12 favorite movies without hassle from any one else. Figured that was a long shot at best. Nuts.

By the way hrdboiled, that's among the coolest Blade Runner movie posters I've ever seen.
 

VF21

#KingsFansForever
Staff member
#32
I was going to try to negotiate my participation in this draft as contingent on me being awarded carte blanche to select my 12 favorite movies without hassle from any one else. Figured that was a long shot at best. Nuts.

By the way hrdboiled, that's among the coolest Blade Runner movie posters I've ever seen.
You just gave me an idea for a future game.

Everybody picks their 12 favorite whatever at the same time (secretly). The object is to get your favorites but NOT duplicate anybody else. Any duplicates are eliminated and whatever unique picks are left are judged against everyone else's lists of unique picks. There would have to be an arbiter people would send their lists to for initial review/removal of duplicated picks. I may put that in the back of my mind (right there with all the spiderwebs and VHS movies) and revisit it at a later time. :)
 

HndsmCelt

Hall of Famer
#33
With the 7th pick of the first round (7th overall)...

Blade Runner (1982) -- Ridley Scott / Neo-Noir

View attachment 7681
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0083658/

____For my money, Ridley Scott's neon psychedelia Future Noir of the early 80s remains the towering achievement in filmic world creation. It's a movie which transports me so fully mind, body, and soul into the plight of a workaday bounty hunter of the future, played by Harrison Ford with the grim anti-heroic determination of all the best noir leads, that I can't help but wonder if I'm recalling a past life or gazing into an alternative reality. Indeed if you were to point the camera at my face at the conclusion of that dramatic rooftop showdown with Roy Batty, I expect my expression would mirror Rick Deckard's blank vaguely artificial gaze. Few and far between are the movies with the capacity to enrapture us. Piece by piece this film strips every signifier of personality away from Deckard until he has no choice but to admit to himself that he's no better or worse than the android prey he's hired to stalk. And in the process we are invited, as the audience, to undergo the same transformation.

____So much more than the sum of it's special effects, this movie to me is an experience of immersion therapy. Based on a novel by Philip K. Dick, the king of paranoid nightmare Science Fiction, and adapted by Ridley Scott as a loose re-imaging of the 1940s Raymond Chandler classic "The Big Sleep", Blade Runner is steeped in the DNA of it's forebears. We get machines that measure empathy, machines that simulate empathy, machines that reject empathy down to their very core. But there's ultimately nothing all that fictional about these fabulous empathy machines popping up in almost every scene. For what is the movie camera if not an empathy machine? It guides the eye so that we may see as others have seen. That giant eye looming over 2019 Los Angeles in the opening shot of the film may be more than just abstract symbolism after all. In summary, this is a movie I don't think I could live without so it has to be my first choice of this or any movie draft. It's all gravy from here on out because I've already got the one movie in my collection I absolutely had to have.

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I give you a standing ovation for your pick and your commentary!
 
#34
Mulholland Dr. (2001), David Lynch

conversationsmulholland_2.jpg


I may have been able to get this film in a later round, but it's my favorite movie so I had to make sure I had it on my list. I won't go into detail because I think this is a movie one should see knowing as little about it as possible. The viewer should just buckle in and enjoy the ride. What I can tell you is that Naomi Watts puts on an absolute acting clinic. She shows an incredible range with plenty of nuance. And David Lynch is at his best, adeptly showing off his trademark style. He creates a very rich picture. Of what, I won't say. But it relies heavily on visual cues, so keep your eyes open.

P.S. The scene containing the screenshot I included is my favorite in all of cinema.
 
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VF21

#KingsFansForever
Staff member
#36
Mulholland Dr. (2001), David Lynch

View attachment 7686

I may have been able to get this film in a later round, but it's my favorite movie so I had to make sure I had it on my list. I am not going to post a link to its IMDb page because I think this is a movie one should see knowing as little about it as possible. The viewer should just buckle in and enjoy the ride. What I can tell you is that Naomi Watts puts on an absolute acting clinic. She shows an incredible range with plenty of nuance. And David Lynch is at his best, adeptly showing off his trademark style. He creates a very rich picture. Of what, I won't say. But it relies heavily on visual cues, so keep your eyes open.

P.S. The scene containing the screenshot I included is my favorite in all of cinema.
The point is to link to the IMDb page so people can read a brief summary if they aren't familiar with the movie. There aren't any spoilers unless you scroll down to the complete summary. Remember, once the draft is over the entire board is going to be invited to vote in the playoffs for best list. It's hard to vote for a movie you know nothing about. ;) (That's why I included the rule about the IMDb link.)
 
#39
By the way hrdboiled, that's among the coolest Blade Runner movie posters I've ever seen.
I agree! I stumbled across an original signed print on ebay once but it sold for $500+ and I have yet to see another. There are some cheap Chinese knockoffs floating around though for MUCH cheaper.
 

Capt. Factorial

This Is Why We Can't Have Nice Things
Staff member
#42
Picking from my phone in the middle of the night (vacation, whatcha gonna do?) so I'll do a proper write up later.

My selection is:

Casablanca (1942)

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0034583/

(note that the quote provided on the YouTube clip is actually wrong - nobody seems to ever get any quote associated with "As Time Goes By" quite right!)

The funny thing about Casablanca is that when I first watched it, I sat down with it like it was a dose of medicine - probably wasn't going to be all that enjoyable, but I figured it would be good for me. It's one of those old films that you hear everybody talking about when you're a teenager and you just know that their nostalgia for films like this came from a time when "movies were bad and we liked 'em that way!" and you sure as heck know better what's a good movie and what's not, don't try to tell me different. Oddly enough in retrospect, my lack of enthusiasm for the film was evidently shared by both the studio and the main actors at the time of production.

But in the end Casablanca was not at all what I - or any of those involved - expected. From the start it was obvious the dialogue was top notch, it was in black and white but looked so artistic, it was able to poke itself in the ribs ("I'm shocked - SHOCKED - to find that gambling is going on in here!"), and I think it was when Bogie recalled the fall of Paris ("I remember every detail. The Germans wore gray, you wore blue.") that I knew that the critical praise of Casablanca was right after all. The raw emotion of the film can probably be encapsulated in Bogart's drunken "You played it for her, you can play it for me. If she can stand it, I can! Play it!" and the film concludes perfectly - not letting the audience off the hook with a fairytale ending.

I don't know if Casablanca is my favorite movie of all time - deciding your favorite movie sometimes feels like choosing a favorite child - but it's certainly among them. I had about four films tabbed as my potential first-round pick with the expectation that none of them would make it to the second round (none did!) and I only had two to choose between when my pick came, so I have to say I'm happy to get this one.
 
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#45
Where was all this Casablanca praise when I snagged it in the 7th round in the first draft? Crickets last time around.

Anyway, Casablanca is a seriously timeless classic. Dialogue and cinematography is phenomenal. Firmly in my personal top 20.

One of my favorite lines of all time: "It would take a miracle to get you out of Casablanca, and the Germans have outlawed miracles."

Great pick.
 

Warhawk

The cake is a lie.
Staff member
#46
Where was all this Casablanca praise when I snagged it in the 7th round in the first draft? Crickets last time around.

Anyway, Casablanca is a seriously timeless classic. Dialogue and cinematography is phenomenal. Firmly in my personal top 20.

One of my favorite lines of all time: "It would take a miracle to get you out of Casablanca, and the Germans have outlawed miracles."

Great pick.
I've never seen it. I know, I know. But I haven't.
 
#48
With the 11th pick in the 2018 TDOS Cabin by the Lake Movie Draft, I select...

Blade Runner 2049 (2017):



Director: Denis Villeneuve
Dir. of Photography: Roger Deakins
Writer(s): Hampton Fancher, Michael Green
Score: Hans Zimmer, Benjamin Wallfisch
Cast: Ryan Gosling, Robin Wright, Ana de Armas, Sylvia Hoeks, Harrison Ford
Genre(s): Science fiction, dystopic fiction, cyberpunk, neo-noir
Runtime: 2 hours, 44 minutes

IMDb Entry: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1856101/?ref_=nv_sr_1


So... @hrdboild beat me to Blade Runner. This was legitimately a bummer for me, though I do not begrudge him his selection. Truthfully, I expected many other films to get picked before Blade Runner, but I am certainly not the only one for whom it is an important film, and it absolutely deserves to be a top-10 selection. I'm actually quite moved by the reality that there are so many fellow blade runners in this thread! I've met so few in my life away from the internet. That said, I'm taking the chance that some of the other significant films on my list will likewise get snatched up so that I can use this opportunity to begin my draft as I had intended. My love of film flows outward from Blade Runner, and selecting Blade Runner 2049 allows me to write about how personal and meaningful the original film is to me through the context of its sequel, a masterwork in its own right.
____________________________________

When I was growing up, it would be fair to say that my father was a bit irresponsible with my eyes and ears. My mother had to work a lot of Saturdays, and dad would use that time to play all kinds of music and movies for me, including those my mom probably would have preferred that I not be exposed to at such a young age. It was almost like my dad just couldn't wait another five or ten years to introduce me to his favorite cultural touchstones. Looking back, I understand that he was trying to share a part of himself with me. It wasn't until after I graduated from college that my father and I developed a really strong relationship. But back then, he could communicate with me through Kings basketball, through music, through movies.

Now, when it came to rated-R features, he couldn't do much to shield me from inappropriate language, but if there was a particularly violent sequence or overly sexual content in a movie that we were watching together, he would tell me to close my eyes, and he would fast forward through the scene. In other words, I didn't grow up on Saturday morning cartoons like many of my childhood friends. I grew up on [partially sanitized versions of] movies like Alien, The Terminator, Predator, Die Hard, Lethal Weapon, and Beverly Hills Cop. Occasionally pops would let me pick the movie I wanted to watch. Those were some of my favorite childhood moments, because they were moments of great discovery for me. I started to develop a taste for film, and a sense of what I liked, and it wasn’t just kiddie fare. It made me feel like an adult. I would rifle through my father's substantial collection of VHS tapes (and Betamax... my dad held onto them well into the 90's) until I found a film title or cover image or tag line that struck me.

One morning, I'm scanning through shelf after shelf of movies, and I see the words "Blade Runner" on the spine of a VHS tape. I pulled it out and saw Harrison Ford was on the cover. I instantly recognized him as Indiana Jones and Han Solo, and I was delighted. I loved those movies, as most little boys do. I popped it in the VCR and, even though it's an R-rated film, my dad didn't really fast forward through too much of it. I was maybe ten years old at the time? And I was surely confounded by what I saw. Blade Runner is bizarre and hypnotic and dystopic and existential and experimental and quite unlike any other science fiction film before it, as well as a great many that followed it (even many of those it would go on to influence). It's also not the kind of movie that a child is readily able to digest. I really didn't like it! It was unsettling, and Harrison Ford was almost unrecognizable to me. He wasn't the hero I knew from his more famous and more family-friendly action movies.

Much to my shame, I wouldn't revisit Blade Runner again until I was a sophomore in college, at age 20, after the "Final Cut" version of the film was re-released to theaters in 2007 (without the clunky, dry, humorless voiceover, and with the original theatrical ending mercifully excised). It was playing at the El Rey in Chico, CA, and I went to see it on a whim with a friend of mine. Perhaps it’s for the best that I stayed away from Blade Runner until my early-20's, though. Upon a second viewing, at a time when an individual is much more open to the unfamiliar, the film just clicked for me. It all fell into place perfectly. The visual language. The production design. The adherence to its aesthetic. The extraordinary use of lighting. The slow, deliberate pacing. The themes it was exploring. The strange magnificence of its score. In fact, I can recall selecting Vangelis' Blade Runner film score with one of my picks for KF.com's Desert Island Music Draft back in 2013. In the five years since then, neither the film nor its score has dislodged itself from my brain. They're with me for life.
____________________________________

Now to discuss Blade Runner 2049, my actual pick for the first round!

When it was announced in 2011 that Ridley Scott was developing a sequel to Blade Runner, his 1982 cult classic and my favorite film ever, I was deeply skeptical. It is not a movie that lends itself to franchising. It’s “Final Cut” version ends on the perfect note of ambiguity, and though it may leave the viewer wanting more, that open-endedness is, in part, what gives the film its lasting power. Beyond that, Ridley Scott is long past his peak as a director. He’s not incapable of making good films on this side of the new millennium, but the bold genius of Alien and Blade Runner are long behind him. Prometheus was a middling attempt to return to the world of Alien, and while The Martian was an enjoyable story of wit and survival, it was lightweight when compared to Scott’s best work.

In 2015, it was announced that Ridley Scott was handing off the Blade Runner sequel to director Denis Villeneuve. The film would be titled Blade Runner 2049, Scott would remain on as an executive producer, and original Blade Runner screenwriter Hampton Fancher would be returning to pen the script, along with Logan screenwriter Michael Green. Ryan Gosling was set to star as the film's protagonist. Harrison Ford was set to return as Rick Deckard. And, perhaps most importantly, Roger Deakins was set to lens the movie. My skepticism turned to cautious optimism. That level of talent behind and in front of the camera could not be denied. Villeneuve is perhaps my favorite filmmaker of the last decade, and Deakins--a master of light if ever there was one--has shot some of the most striking films in history.

On October 6, 2017, this Blade Runner devotee was in the theater for its sequel, nervous and elated in equal measure. My eyes were awed by what I saw. In short, I thought it was f***ing marvelous. I really did. The use of practical sets and practical effects, and the careful application of digital effects, made the world feel so tangible, so alive. Aesthetically, it brought a gorgeous, towering, almost brutalist take to the world of Blade Runner. I was stunned that production designer Dennis Gassner had managed to straddle the near-impossible line between honoring the first film's tremendously influential aesthetic and plausibly expanding on it in a new and equally powerful way. It might be the single most impressive and holistic visual achievement on screen since the first Blade Runner. It's score manages to find that same balance, bringing its own punishing, brutalist take on Vangelis' original ambient compositions.

There were flaws in the film, of course. I have no intention of spoiling 2049 for those who haven't seen it, but suffice it to say that it’s not a perfect film by any stretch of the imagination. Then again, neither is the first Blade Runner, if I'm being honest, and that remains the single most important film of all time to me. As an audience member, I've found I do not require that a film achieves perfection in order for it to resonate deeply with me. More often than not, it’s the messy, imperfect ones that I love the most. I would go on to see 2049 in theaters another four times. It was that powerful of an experience for me, and I regret that more people didn't see it in theaters. It demands to be seen on the biggest screen possible, equipped with the best bone-rattling speakers that money can buy.

Part of me wants Blade Runner 2049 to find a larger audience, because I believe it’s a film that deserves one. But I also would not mind if it never did find a larger audience. Not everybody needs to like everything. Online culture has become such a toxic wasteland where people regularly confuse personal taste with righteousness. I will argue that Blade Runner is a masterpiece, and I will argue for its belated sequel to be considered so, as well. In some ways, I felt like 2049 belonged to me, like it was hand-crafted specifically for my sensibility. That is a deeply silly and narcissistic pose to strike, of course, but every time I watch it, I can't shake the feeling that this one is mine. As important as Blade Runner is to me, I'm only 31 years old. I don't belong to the generation that first encountered it in theaters, that had their worlds changed at the moment of its release.

Funny enough, perhaps the greatest inheritance that Blade Runner 2049 carries from the first film is its failure at the box office. It's destined for cult status, just like its predecessor. I certainly don’t require critical reception or box office receipts to vindicate my love for these movies, and I'm grateful that somebody thought it was a good idea to give Denis Villeneuve and Roger Deakins $180 million to craft a cerebral sci-fi film that few people would bother to see. How amazing that 2049 got made at all, and with the kind of budget that allowed it to be composed so grandly and sumptuously on the screen?

I was so thrilled that 2049 exceeded whatever expectations I might have had for a sequel to my favorite film of all time. But nor do I believe they should try this again. It's a minor miracle that it worked so well, and that it's such a visually and thematically powerful film. I am quite satisfied with 2049 being a strange outlier in the landscape of contemporary Hollywood sequels, successful on artistic terms, but unsuccessful commercially. It seems much better that than the reverse, in my opinion. The original Blade Runner is evidence enough of that.

Not everybody has this experience with art, but for me, Blade Runner was like a key that unlocked a door to a new way of understanding both the world around me and my place in it. Though it was originally released in 1982, it could still reach audience members who were as receptive to its wavelength as I was in 2007, and again ten years later, when it’s sequel arrived in theaters. It's not a stretch to say the "me" that walked out of the theater in both 2007 and 2017 was not the same person as the "me" that walked in. Melodramatic as that may sound, I truly believe in the transportive power of art. Blade Runner helped me understand that filmmaking, as a medium, was about more than narrative, and about more than entertainment. It helped me understand that music could be intensely visual, as well as formless. It helped me understand that patience is essential to any act of interpretation. It taught me to slow down.

At age 10, I encountered Blade Runner for the first time. It confounded me. At age 20, I encountered Blade Runner for the second time. It changed my world. At age 30, I encountered its sequel, Blade Runner 2049. It clarified the way I approach that world. Each decade of my life has begun with Blade Runner's influence at its heart. I consider both Blade Runner and Blade Runner 2049 to be science fiction tone poems, and they’ve even managed to help me understand better how I wanted to approach my own creative impulses as a writer of poetry. I didn't know it back in 2007, but I needed Blade Runner, and it’s sequel has proven to be a salve for my soul in the same way, against all odds, in a Hollywood environment where the mad dash to capitalize on nostalgia results in a lot of ill-considered, unnecessary, and artistically bankrupt films.

Blade Runner 2049 is a stunning achievement, and it’s absolutely worth 2 hours and 44 minutes' worth of your time.









PM sent to @Sluggah.
 
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Warhawk

The cake is a lie.
Staff member
#49
With the 11th pick in the 2018 TDOS Cabin by the Lake Movie Draft, I select...

Blade Runner 2049 (2017)
Excellent pick as well - likely my next selection if it wasn't gone. But I figured both Blade Runners might be off the board by then, especially with you participating.

Edit - also, knowing how important these films are to you from our previous exchanges about them and others, I was hoping you would be able to snag at least one of them. :)
 
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#51
Padrino picked 2049?!

I'm shocked, shocked.

Truthfully though, while Blade Runner and 2049 are both in my top 10, I'm glad the latter went to you. My write-up wouldn't have done it as much justice as yours. Among the greatest sequels every made and Deakins work is positively transcendent.

Im sure it will bring you Joi.
 
#53
So...this decade rule is killing me. Haven’t seen much before the 80’s, and liked even less, so I guess I have to pick those first or I’ll end up having to pick something I’ve never actually seen. The Casablanca pick really puts me in a bad spot. That being said, nothing should take away from this selection...

Alien 1979, Ridley Scott

F91142EA-7C4F-48C2-BABA-671520CC0DE2.jpeg

Now, my parents weren’t super strict or great at parenting, so I first saw this movie at a very young age. It was my first taste of both the sci-fi and horror genres. While others seemed traumatized, I was totally mesmerized. The atmosphere and tension...the music, cinematography & production design that created it...just outstanding. This has always struck me as near perfect film craft. That Scott’s next film was Blade Runner totally blows my mind. Top of his game.

IMDb
 

VF21

#KingsFansForever
Staff member
#54
So...this decade rule is killing me. Haven’t seen much before the 80’s, and liked even less, so I guess I have to pick those first or I’ll end up having to pick something I’ve never actually seen. The Casablanca pick really puts me in a bad spot. That being said, nothing should take away from this selection...

Alien 1979, Ridley Scott

View attachment 7695

Now, my parents weren’t super strict or great at parenting, so I first saw this movie at a very young age. It was my first taste of both the sci-fi and horror genres. While others seemed traumatized, I was totally mesmerized. The atmosphere and tension...the music, cinematography & production design that created it...just outstanding. This has always struck me as near perfect film craft. That Scott’s next film was Blade Runner totally blows my mind. Top of his game.

IMDb
You only have to pick one movie from the 70s and one from the 60s or earlier. The real benefit, I think, of the decade rule is it forces people out of their comfort zones just a bit. :)
 
#55
Alien's gone too now? Wow, this is brutal. I'm so happy I got Blade Runner when I did but movies are tumbling off the top of my wishlist rapidly now. I'll post some screenshots for you folks that took my movies since I obviously can't use them now. :)

Also... I'm one of the few Blade Runner fans that did not like 2049 I suppose. It would take me a long time to explain why and I don't really want to go into all the details. But if I can try to briefly state some of the big points. I watched the original 1982 film for the first time while I was working on a film history project in 10th grade. I was also confounded after my first viewing but it was sufficiently interesting that I rewound the tape (we're all dating ourselves here aren't we?) and watched it straight through a second time. It's such an insular film that it takes a few viewings to pry it open and get past the surface to where all the philosophical introspection lies. But once you get there it truly is a film that never gets old. I've watched it more times than any other movie and I'm transfixed every time. I decided it was my favorite movie around senior year of high school and vowed to watch it every year on my birthday (a tradition I still stick to, what is this, 18 years later?)

When the announcement was made that a sequel was going to happen I was also skeptical. The ambiguous ending is part of what makes the first movie so wonderful. How do you continue on where that story ends without picking a side on the "Is Deckard a Replicant or not?" argument and potentially alienating half the fans? I'm also a screenwriter so I eventually decided that I was just going to have to write my own version and see if it can be done. I decided to move the story up to San Francisco where the book takes place. I also wanted to see what Off-World looks like, if only briefly. The story was going to center around a Gaff inspired character (a sortof police bureaucrat in a suit) who is in his 50s now and gets hired by the Tyrell corporation to track down a rogue Blade Runner model replicant who has VK'ed himself and disappeared, popping up again Off World and murdering (retiring) replicants who haven't done anything wrong. Like the first film it would center around the idea of personal identity -- how do we know what we are, what makes us human? I spent years outlining it but only ended up writing a dozen pages or so. It was taking me a long time and the prospects of actually making a movie to which I don't own the rights were so remote that I decided to divert my energy into other projects.

Anyway, flash forward to the release of 2049 last year. I went into it with trepidation having recently seen Denis Villeneuve's previous film Arrival which I felt completely butchered a beautifully optimistic and humanistic short story and made it into something far darker and, I would say funereal. I also of course had the movie I invented bouncing around in my head constantly to compare this sequel to. Blade Runner 2049 is marvelously shot (always a given with Roger Deakins) and has some of the same thematic material with a main character trying to solve a case and sort out at the same time who they are and where they come from. It was an interesting angle telling the audience that the main character is a replicant right from the beginning and I wished they'd carried on with this theme of a divided society and bigotry toward replicants further than they did. It also had some great scenes -- the whole section of the story involving the toy horse for example. My main issues with the movie began as soon as Deckard was introduced because it started answering questions that I didn't really want answered (which is what I was afraid would happen). I don't personally care what happens to Deckard and Rachel after the first movie. I have my own version of how their story ends that feels poetic and appropriate to me but more than any movie I can think of Blade Runner is more about theme and setting than plot. And visually, while it is masterfully lit and lensed it is massively suffering from the loss of Ridley Scott's eye. The images in Blade Runner all have 20 things happening in every frame while 2049 is much more into broad strokes.

This thread has become such a Blade Runner celebration at this point that I felt like sharing a little of that. Blade Runner is very personal to me, it feels like my movie. Like you Padrino I know very few people who "get it". Most of the people I introduce it to are bored which doesn't surprise me since I didn't like it right off the bat either and I don't honestly expect other people to return to movies they didn't like in hopes that they might change their minds since there's just so many other things out there bidding for our attention. I don't know if there will be more Blade Runner movies or not. It's hard to justify it as a commercial venture at this point. I'd like to think my version of a sequel is relevant and artistically interesting but it may not be. I can't objectively judge. Anyway, thanks for sharing your comments Padrino -- I enjoyed reading about your relationship to these movies. It's nice to know there are other people out there who enjoy diving into this world over and over again and contemplating the questions it asks of us.
 
#58
With my 1st pick in the TDOS Cabin by the Lake Movie draft, I select:

The Princess Bride (1987)

the-princess-bride-30th-anniversary_u-L-Q19V4AU0.jpg

IMDB Link: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0093779/

Fencing, fighting, torture, revenge, giants, monsters, chases, escapes, true love, miracles...What's not to like?

I was enamored by this film at an early age. It has adventure for the boys, is romantic enough for date night, and each showing remains enjoyable, nostalgic, and endearing. My first viewing of this was in the Off Broad Street Theater in Nevada City, CA, where they moved out the chairs, and brought in the couches instead. It has remained a staple in my movie collection ever after and I look forward to sharing it with family in the cabin for many years to come :).


Quotes:
"Who are you?"
"No one of consequence."
"I must know"
"Get used to disappointment"
"Kay"

"It's not my fault for being the biggest and the strongest...I don't even exercise."

"I do not envy you the headache you will have when you awake. But in the meantime, rest well. Dream of large women."

"Life is pain highness. Anyone who tells you differently is selling something."

"Where are the sports, are you trying to trick me? Is this a kissing book?"

"Tyrone, you know how much I love watching you work, but I've got my country's 500th anniversary to plan, my wedding to arrange, my wife to murder, and Gilder to frame for it, I'm swamped"
"Get some rest. If you haven't got your health , you haven't got anything."

"You're right sonny, true love is the greatest thing in the world...except for a nice MLT, mutton lettuce and tomato sandwich when the mutton is nice and lean, and the tomatoes are crisp, ah, it's so perky, I love it."
 
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VF21

#KingsFansForever
Staff member
#59
The Movies thread was always my favorite. I'm glad I finally decided to participate. I really think you can learn a lot about people by the movies they like.
 

VF21

#KingsFansForever
Staff member
#60
With my 1st pick in the TDOS Cabin by the Lake Movie draft, I select:

The Princess Bride (1987)

View attachment 7710

Fencing, fighting, torture, revenge, true love, miracles...What's not to like?

I was enamored by this film at an early age. It has adventure for the boys, is romantic enough for date night, and each showing remains enjoyable, nostalgic, and endearing. My first viewing of this was in the Off Broad Street theater in Nevada City, CA, where they moved out the chairs, and brought in the couches instead. It has remained a staple in my movie collection ever after and I look forward to sharing it with my family in my cabin for many years to come :).

IMDB Link: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0093779/
...sigh...