Coronavirus

VF21

#KingsFansForever
Staff member
MOD NOTE: While it's tempting, we know, this is not the place to debate the politics or social commentary about COVID-19. A few posts have been deleted as they were veering off course. Thanks for understanding.
 
On CNBC, they're talking about sports owners potentially being forced to sell. Folks most at risk:

1. Owners with non-sports businesses, who are dramatically impacted by the shutdown.
2. Teams with new arenas and, more importantly, real estate interests that surround the arena (Kings, Warriors, Milwaukee).

Something to ponder.
 
That sounds like fantasy talk because everybody's assets are down, so are they going to sell at rock bottom when valuations have gone up dramatically since the Kings and Clippers sold? I had heard Bezos liquidated ahead of the market crash. He doesn't really strike me as the kind of dude that would do something decent for Seattle, but that would be slightly ironic. Wasn't it the temporary relocation of the Hornets due to Katrina that lead to the realization of OKC as a NBA destination?

Honestly - I think the more likely scenario here could be that leagues with struggling owners would allow an expansion team or two in and share evenly. I don't think we will see a firesale on teams. The Maloofs held out until they had virtually lost everything else.
 
That sounds like fantasy talk because everybody's assets are down, so are they going to sell at rock bottom when valuations have gone up dramatically since the Kings and Clippers sold? I had heard Bezos liquidated ahead of the market crash. He doesn't really strike me as the kind of dude that would do something decent for Seattle, but that would be slightly ironic. Wasn't it the temporary relocation of the Hornets due to Katrina that lead to the realization of OKC as a NBA destination?

Honestly - I think the more likely scenario here could be that leagues with struggling owners would allow an expansion team or two in and share evenly. I don't think we will see a firesale on teams. The Maloofs held out until they had virtually lost everything else.
Don't know if a primary owner would sell, but likely a few minority owners will. Depends on their individual economics. There was a lot of forced selling a few weeks ago, so who knows. Most business, small to large, don't carry a ton of cash reserves. Sports teams aren't any different, especially ones that have new RE commitments around their arenas.
 
Don't know if a primary owner would sell, but likely a few minority owners will. Depends on their individual economics. There was a lot of forced selling a few weeks ago, so who knows. Most business, small to large, don't carry a ton of cash reserves. Sports teams aren't any different, especially ones that have new RE commitments around their arenas.
Minority owners makes more sense. If I was a bajillionaire it wouldn't make sense to me or my ego though unless I was the face of the team. You're right that these aren't really cash positive businesses. Vanity thing for the most part. Though if you own a team for a generation or so you make a killing.
 
I have been considering the consequences of it on pro sports. Maybe smaller seating at venues means less revenue coming in and who gets bumped out of their seats. It would be worse than the la coliseum renovation down in la.

Throw in the money from China maybe having a impact as I truly see most folks in the states not happy with China. Heck if the nba was worried about one person talking trash about China well?
What will be the cap next year? Maybe the contracts in place are okay but I have to believe anyone their right mind with a players option will be taking that.

I am pretty sure life like we know it will return to more like it was before this blew up but seating arrangements from theaters and restaurants to sporting event and concert seating just may be forever changed. I can see say a restaurant with seating for like 115 for example becoming like 65 or 70 with the same space.

Times they are a changing
 

VF21

#KingsFansForever
Staff member
MOD NOTE: While it's tempting, we know, this is not the place to debate the politics or social commentary about COVID-19. A few posts have been deleted as they were veering off course. Thanks for understanding.
Just a reminder... we've kept the thread to share information, not to speculate on what might or might not happen in the future. We know it's tempting but this isn't really the place. (And based on a couple of posts we've already had to delete, those things invariably turn to politics within an alarmingly short period of time...)
 

rainmaker

Hall of Famer
Hope all of you and your loved ones are doing ok. I'm just over here in CA staying inside with my GF. We're bored, but fine. Her parents are fine.

My family lives in NY which is concerning though. It's an absolute war zone over there. I told my mom not to even look at her front door let alone consider walking out of it...lol.
Not good here in NY. Multiple deaths already from people I know thru work. A number more in and around my company are infected. A few very sick. Hospitals at max capacity. At this point it has hit everyone's social and work circles.

Another concern is test results are taking 8 days for people I know. So the current numbers released, 102K infected, are actually the number infected from a week ago. And that's only those who even qualified for a test.

My county is increasing at 1K+ per day and the state at about 10K per day. The actual number currently infected here is 150-200K given the rolling delay.
 
Well we have some basketball new even if it’s the WNBA. They’re going to still have their with a virtual draft format with the players at home.

If this season comes to a early end I can see the same result for the NBA. Man this nba season had gone down the tubes and with no clear path to determine when or if the season continues I can see it moving straight towards the playoffs in some form.
 

VF21

#KingsFansForever
Staff member
Sacramento Kings Announce Natomas Arena to Serve as Surge Hospital and $250,000 Donation to Support Area Community Organizations in COVID-19 Response Efforts
Sacramento Kings Foundation Commits $250,000 to Help Provide Essential Services and Supplies to Individuals and Families in Need During Crisis.
| APR 03, 2020




-- Team Donates 100,000 Medical Masks to State and Local Health Agencies --

Today, the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services announced plans for the California Department of Public Health, in collaboration with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, to convert the Natomas arena and practice facility into a surge field hospital to provide critical medical services for coronavirus and trauma care patients. The hospital, which will house approximately 360 beds along with additional hospital services, will provide additional capacity for the Sacramento region in response to the expected surge in patients due to the COVID-19 health crisis.
To further assist the state and city in its fight against the coronavirus, the Sacramento Kings are making additional contributions, including donating $250,000 to support area community organizations providing essential services and supplies to families and individuals in need, and the donation of 100,000 medical masks to state and local health agencies.
“On behalf of the entire Kings family, our hearts are with all who have been affected by this pandemic,” said Sacramento Kings Chairman, CEO and Owner Vivek Ranadivé. “California always leads the nation and the world, and we applaud Governor Newsom’s strong and decisive leadership to keep Californians healthy and safe during this crisis. His deft guidance and preparation serve as a shining example for leaders across America. We owe a huge debt of gratitude to all the medical professionals and frontline workers risking their lives every day and making tremendous sacrifices to protect us and provide essential services. Our deepest thanks go out to all of the local public health experts and elected officials, including Mayor Steinberg and Councilmember Ashby, working to safeguard the community during this unprecedented time.
“Our community has always come first, and that is more important now than ever,” Ranadivé continued. “The Kings are proud to help by providing additional space to accommodate a predicted surge in patients. We are also donating masks to help keep people healthy, and critical resources to area organizations that are addressing food insecurity and other issues as a result of the coronavirus. I have always been in awe of the resilience and ingenuity of the American people and firmly believe that together, we will defeat this invisible enemy.”
"These days, our state’s soaring spirit is on full display – with Californians from every walk of life standing together, even while staying at home,” said California Governor Gavin Newsom. “The State of California is working with the Kings to repurpose the team's former home to help treat COVID-19 patients and meet the coming surge in demand for hospital space. This facility, which for decades brought joy to the lives of Californians, will now be in the business of saving lives. I applaud the Kings and all the federal, state and local officials who worked in concert to make it happen.”
Additional details on the team’s contributions to support state and local COVID-19 response efforts:
$250,000 to Support Community Organizations: The Sacramento Kings Foundation will donate $250,000 to area community organizations providing food services, essential supplies and other resources and relief to our region’s most vulnerable families and individuals as a result of the COVID-19 health crisis. Details on the specific organizations receiving funds is forthcoming.
Donation of 100,000 Medical Masks: The Kings will donate 100,000 medical masks to state and city health agencies to distribute to hospitals and healthcare institutions with a shortage of supplies.
The Natomas arena surge hospital will also provide increased opportunities to accrue scheduled shifts for Kings and partner team members who are unable to work due to the closure of Golden 1 Center. Already, many part-time Kings event team members have secured temporary employment through priority hiring programs in place with partners like Raley’s.
As the world works to combat COVID-19, the Kings are committed to using basketball as a platform for advancing social good by spreading awareness and support throughout our community. Earlier this week, the organization launched “In This Together,” an initiative to engage and connect through online activations, health awareness, physical and educational activities, business support and more. Last month, the Kings joined forces with Legends Hospitality to donate nearly 5,000 pounds of prepared and perishable food to the Sacramento Food Bank and the Sacramento County Office of Education to help feed individuals in need and families impacted by school closures. To learn more about “In This Together” and the team’s efforts to give back, visit Kings.com/Together.
 
The nba has asked the players association for a 50% reduced in pay. The players association countered with a 25% reduction in pay to start in May.

It’s nice that both sides seem to understand that something has to be down to cushion the financial blow this virus has caused.
 
Why not a sliding scale? That would seem right to me, even with minimum salaries as high as they are I can see how those guys might have trouble meeting a mortgage payment but I struggle to see how the guys making 10 mil per couldn't make it work on 50% (of what the final 15% of the year?). And yeah, I'll never underestimate financial illiteracy. But still.
 
From what I read there won't be a vaccine. And if there is the antibodies may not stay around long enough to be effective. There is no vaccine for a cold for the same reason. SARS and MERS are coronavirus's that have been around over 10 years and no vaccine.
curious where you are reading there won’t be a vaccine? That’s the opposite of everything I’ve read and heard. They’ve also said due to it he virus mutating so slowly, a vaccine should effective long term .
 
My prediction:

There will be no MLB this year.

There will be no NFL season (or, possibly playing the games with no fans, and only tested players can play).

There may very well be no NBA season next year.

This well DECIMATE pro sports, and college sports revenue as well. College sports will suffer more because there is less of a "legitimate" economic reason to hold them. But there is obviously a tangible economic benefit to the schools, who will suffer greatly without this revenue. This will cause major changes to academia in general. Schools simply cannot justify the risk since they are in essence not doing it for "profit" (though are doing it for revenue).

Even if and when sports leagues open back up, consistent attendance will plummet. I'm talking slashed by 50% at least for a decade. The only way to avoid this is with a medical breakthrough that eradicates the virus or eliminates the death risk. Until then, which could take years, sports will not recover.

A major pillar of American social and economic life will fall.
 
T

The Sacramento Bee

Guest


Kings rookie Kyle Guy is urging people to follow public health orders after losing a loved one to the coronavirus. Guy shared his grief in a moving tribute to his grandfather Saturday on Instagram. Guy said his grandfather died Friday night, apparently after contracting COVID-19 in the global coronavirus pandemic that has killed nearly 57,000 worldwide, according to the World Health Organization.

Continue reading...
 
Sacramento Kings Announce Natomas Arena to Serve as Surge Hospital and $250,000 Donation to Support Area Community Organizations in COVID-19 Response Efforts
Sacramento Kings Foundation Commits $250,000 to Help Provide Essential Services and Supplies to Individuals and Families in Need During Crisis.
| APR 03, 2020




-- Team Donates 100,000 Medical Masks to State and Local Health Agencies --

Today, the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services announced plans for the California Department of Public Health, in collaboration with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, to convert the Natomas arena and practice facility into a surge field hospital to provide critical medical services for coronavirus and trauma care patients. The hospital, which will house approximately 360 beds along with additional hospital services, will provide additional capacity for the Sacramento region in response to the expected surge in patients due to the COVID-19 health crisis.
To further assist the state and city in its fight against the coronavirus, the Sacramento Kings are making additional contributions, including donating $250,000 to support area community organizations providing essential services and supplies to families and individuals in need, and the donation of 100,000 medical masks to state and local health agencies.
“On behalf of the entire Kings family, our hearts are with all who have been affected by this pandemic,” said Sacramento Kings Chairman, CEO and Owner Vivek Ranadivé. “California always leads the nation and the world, and we applaud Governor Newsom’s strong and decisive leadership to keep Californians healthy and safe during this crisis. His deft guidance and preparation serve as a shining example for leaders across America. We owe a huge debt of gratitude to all the medical professionals and frontline workers risking their lives every day and making tremendous sacrifices to protect us and provide essential services. Our deepest thanks go out to all of the local public health experts and elected officials, including Mayor Steinberg and Councilmember Ashby, working to safeguard the community during this unprecedented time.
“Our community has always come first, and that is more important now than ever,” Ranadivé continued. “The Kings are proud to help by providing additional space to accommodate a predicted surge in patients. We are also donating masks to help keep people healthy, and critical resources to area organizations that are addressing food insecurity and other issues as a result of the coronavirus. I have always been in awe of the resilience and ingenuity of the American people and firmly believe that together, we will defeat this invisible enemy.”
"These days, our state’s soaring spirit is on full display – with Californians from every walk of life standing together, even while staying at home,” said California Governor Gavin Newsom. “The State of California is working with the Kings to repurpose the team's former home to help treat COVID-19 patients and meet the coming surge in demand for hospital space. This facility, which for decades brought joy to the lives of Californians, will now be in the business of saving lives. I applaud the Kings and all the federal, state and local officials who worked in concert to make it happen.”
Additional details on the team’s contributions to support state and local COVID-19 response efforts:
$250,000 to Support Community Organizations: The Sacramento Kings Foundation will donate $250,000 to area community organizations providing food services, essential supplies and other resources and relief to our region’s most vulnerable families and individuals as a result of the COVID-19 health crisis. Details on the specific organizations receiving funds is forthcoming.
Donation of 100,000 Medical Masks: The Kings will donate 100,000 medical masks to state and city health agencies to distribute to hospitals and healthcare institutions with a shortage of supplies.
The Natomas arena surge hospital will also provide increased opportunities to accrue scheduled shifts for Kings and partner team members who are unable to work due to the closure of Golden 1 Center. Already, many part-time Kings event team members have secured temporary employment through priority hiring programs in place with partners like Raley’s.
As the world works to combat COVID-19, the Kings are committed to using basketball as a platform for advancing social good by spreading awareness and support throughout our community. Earlier this week, the organization launched “In This Together,” an initiative to engage and connect through online activations, health awareness, physical and educational activities, business support and more. Last month, the Kings joined forces with Legends Hospitality to donate nearly 5,000 pounds of prepared and perishable food to the Sacramento Food Bank and the Sacramento County Office of Education to help feed individuals in need and families impacted by school closures. To learn more about “In This Together” and the team’s efforts to give back, visit Kings.com/Together.
If only the Kings could be as great on the court as they are off it.
 

Capt. Factorial

This Is Why We Can't Have Nice Things
Staff member
My prediction:

There will be no MLB this year.

There will be no NFL season (or, possibly playing the games with no fans, and only tested players can play).

There may very well be no NBA season next year.

This well DECIMATE pro sports, and college sports revenue as well. College sports will suffer more because there is less of a "legitimate" economic reason to hold them. But there is obviously a tangible economic benefit to the schools, who will suffer greatly without this revenue. This will cause major changes to academia in general. Schools simply cannot justify the risk since they are in essence not doing it for "profit" (though are doing it for revenue).

Even if and when sports leagues open back up, consistent attendance will plummet. I'm talking slashed by 50% at least for a decade. The only way to avoid this is with a medical breakthrough that eradicates the virus or eliminates the death risk. Until then, which could take years, sports will not recover.

A major pillar of American social and economic life will fall.
Way too pessimistic take from L'Optimisme here. A couple of weeks of shelter-in-place makes folks forget it's still early April. We'll get through this.

My prediction:

There will be MLB this season, but the season will likely be 100 games or fewer.

NFL season will go on as usual.

After desperately trying to make something sensible work out, the NBA will give up on playoffs this year. Next season will go off as normal, with no shift in the starting date needed once "late playoffs" are scrapped.

College sports (football/basketball) next season will be relatively unaffected.

Sports fans will return to their sports in droves, and any drop in attendance due to fear of contagion (10% at best) will quickly be made up for if the teams drop pricing to adjust for it. Sports will remain strong.
 
Oregon hasn't been hit too hard (this shocks me because I think we were too slow considering we are sandwiched between CA and WA who called for shelter in place a week before we did and were hit hard). From the models I saw this week, our hospital is predicted to hit their peak sometime in early May. And all operations restored to normal by June. So I suspect that will be when sports resume, mid-June. But if we have another wave of outbreaks after the shelter orders are listed it's anyone's bet.
 
curious where you are reading there won’t be a vaccine? That’s the opposite of everything I’ve read and heard. They’ve also said due to it he virus mutating so slowly, a vaccine should effective long term .
SARS and MERS have been around for decades without a vaccine. There is no vaccine for the common cold. They are all corona viruses. Even if they find a vaccine it may only last a month in a persons system. The long term side effects of a vaccine could be worse than the virus.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-00798-8
 
SARS and MERS have been around for decades without a vaccine. There is no vaccine for the common cold. They are all corona viruses. Even if they find a vaccine it may only last a month in a persons system. The long term side effects of a vaccine could be worse than the virus.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-00798-8
Yeah I got that from your original post. . But I have not heard anything around no vaccination eventually being found for COVID-19, quite the contrary actually. And yes there is always going to be a risk of side effect(s) detection, or lack thereof, with accelerated testing. I also mentioned about the slow mutation and that being a positive for a long term vaccination .

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.wa...a-b148-e4ce3fbd85b5_story.html?outputType=amp
 
Way too pessimistic take from L'Optimisme here. A couple of weeks of shelter-in-place makes folks forget it's still early April. We'll get through this.

My prediction:

There will be MLB this season, but the season will likely be 100 games or fewer.

NFL season will go on as usual.

After desperately trying to make something sensible work out, the NBA will give up on playoffs this year. Next season will go off as normal, with no shift in the starting date needed once "late playoffs" are scrapped.

College sports (football/basketball) next season will be relatively unaffected.

Sports fans will return to their sports in droves, and any drop in attendance due to fear of contagion (10% at best) will quickly be made up for if the teams drop pricing to adjust for it. Sports will remain strong.
See here: https://www.sfgate.com/49ers/article/NFL-coronavirus-return-on-time-stadiums-cancel-15179444.php
 
Lots of traction going on with antibody treatment as we speak and vaccine development.

I think we'll see a vaccine by September-October (FDA roadblocks will be removed).

But I think deaths should at least slow done with continuous antibody intervention. They are already utilizing it at some hospitals.

Hopefully more and more recovered donate plasma or as I've read that they ramp up lab made antibody creation which I know they're doing now.

Regarding side effects, I don't know enough about potential side effects.
 

VF21

#KingsFansForever
Staff member


Kings rookie Kyle Guy is urging people to follow public health orders after losing a loved one to the coronavirus. Guy shared his grief in a moving tribute to his grandfather Saturday on Instagram. Guy said his grandfather died Friday night, apparently after contracting COVID-19 in the global coronavirus pandemic that has killed nearly 57,000 worldwide, according to the World Health Organization.

Continue reading...
:(
 
Way too pessimistic take from L'Optimisme here. A couple of weeks of shelter-in-place makes folks forget it's still early April. We'll get through this.

My prediction:

There will be MLB this season, but the season will likely be 100 games or fewer.

NFL season will go on as usual.

After desperately trying to make something sensible work out, the NBA will give up on playoffs this year. Next season will go off as normal, with no shift in the starting date needed once "late playoffs" are scrapped.

College sports (football/basketball) next season will be relatively unaffected.

Sports fans will return to their sports in droves, and any drop in attendance due to fear of contagion (10% at best) will quickly be made up for if the teams drop pricing to adjust for it. Sports will remain strong.
Baseball may have 2 or 3 double headers a week, players are already on board. Obviously, some changing to number of active players for pitchers will need to be modified.
 
Yeah I got that from your original post. . But I have not heard anything around no vaccination eventually being found for COVID-19, quite the contrary actually. And yes there is always going to be a risk of side effect(s) detection, or lack thereof, with accelerated testing. I also mentioned about the slow mutation and that being a positive for a long term vaccination .

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.washingtonpost.com/health/the-coronavirus-isnt-mutating-quickly-suggesting-a-vaccine-would-offer-lasting-protection/2020/03/24/406522d6-6dfd-11ea-b148-e4ce3fbd85b5_story.html?outputType=amp
It would be the first one for a corona virus.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/04/when-will-a-coronavirus-vaccine-be-ready

Some Highlights

Clinical trials, an essential precursor to regulatory approval, usually take place in three phases. The first, involving a few dozen healthy volunteers, tests the vaccine for safety, monitoring for adverse effects. The second, involving several hundred people, usually in a part of the world affected by the disease, looks at how effective the vaccine is, and the third does the same in several thousand people. But there’s a high level of attrition as experimental vaccines pass through these phases. “Not all horses that leave the starting gate will finish the race,” says Bruce Gellin, who runs the global immunisation programme for the Washington DC-based nonprofit, the Sabin Vaccine Institute.

There are good reasons for that. Either the candidates are unsafe, or they’re ineffective, or both. Screening out duds is essential, which is why clinical trials can’t be skipped or hurried. Approval can be accelerated if regulators have approved similar products before. The annual flu vaccine, for example, is the product of a well-honed assembly line in which only one or a few modules have to be updated each year. In contrast, Sars-CoV-2 is a novel pathogen in humans, and many of the technologies being used to build vaccines are relatively untested too. No vaccine made from genetic material – RNA or DNA – has been approved to date, for example. So the Covid-19 vaccine candidates have to be treated as brand new vaccines, and as Gellin says: “While there is a push to do things as fast as possible, it’s really important not to take shortcuts.”
An illustration of that is a vaccine that was produced in the 1960s against respiratory syncytial virus, a common virus that causes cold-like symptoms in children. In clinical trials, this vaccine was found to aggravate those symptoms in infants who went on to catch the virus. A similar effect was observed in animals given an early experimental Sars vaccine. It was later modified to eliminate that problem but, now that it has been repurposed for Sars-CoV-2, it will need to be put through especially stringent safety testing to rule out the risk of enhanced disease.
It’s for these reasons that taking a vaccine candidate all the way to regulatory approval typically takes a decade or more, and why President Trump sowed confusion when, at a meeting at the White House on 2 March, he pressed for a vaccine to be ready by the US elections in November – an impossible deadline. “Like most vaccinologists, I don’t think this vaccine will be ready before 18 months,” says Annelies Wilder-Smith, professor of emerging infectious diseases at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. That’s already extremely fast, and it assumes there will be no hitches.
 
Yes, I get ever you are saying. However that’s not what I was questioning. You said you had heard there would be no vaccination, That seems to contradict what’s being said. Is it going to be here next week, next month, next year? No, most likely not. Was just trying to get clarification where you got that there would be no vaccine? Above just outlines what kind of effort and time it takes to get something tested, approved, etc.
 
It's not what people want to hear, but it's likely that sheltering in place will be necessary for many, many more months. California is fortunate in that the governor seems to have gotten ahead of this thing enough to keep our early exposure down, and we should be able to flatten the curve in a more expedited manner than most states (as long as we maintain social distancing). But one needs only to look at China's recent relaxing of their coronavirus measures, and the subsequent recurrence of the virus' spread in their country, to recognize just how vigilant we will need to be if we don't want COVID-19 to claim the lives of hundreds of thousands of Americans. Business will have to adapt. And the feds, the states, and local governments will need to do much to ease the financial toll this will exact on families.

Unfortunately, it means we're not likely to be out of the woods by summer or autumn, the way many are forecasting. And I certainly can't imagine a vaccine being ready and mobilized for mass delivery before summer 2021 at the absolute earliest. It needs to be tested. It needs to work. It needs to be safe.

Of course, I understand the impulse to want to believe we can just beat this thing into submission, like COVID-19 is an enemy we're warring against. But it doesn't care about our guns and our ingenuity and our American exceptionalism. It doesn't care about anything, period. It just spreads, efficiently and dispassionately. Americans are optimistic by nature. Californians even moreso. But magical thinking won't save us. Listen to the doctors and the nurses. Listen to the scientists and other related experts. They're the heroes in this particular fight.
 
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