BBIQ

#1
Nothing about Bogi having "low IQ" turning the ball over and then taking the 3 at the end eh? Guess it only matters when it's "bench player" Buddy Hield.
Bogi's BBIQ is in a constant battle with his ego. He's a smart player, with the exception of the blindspot that is his own sense of who he is. He thinks he's the ****, even on nights when he isn't. It's frustrating.

Buddy is who he is. A sharp shooting airhead.

I'm not above or below leveling criticism at either, myself. But if I had to point my finger at one of the two, it's not gonna be the guy who dropped 41 points on great efficiency.
 
#2
Bogi's BBIQ is in a constant battle with his ego. He's a smart player, with the exception of the blindspot that is his own sense of who he is. He thinks he's the ****, even on nights when he isn't. It's frustrating.

Buddy is who he is. A sharp shooting airhead.

I'm not above or below leveling criticism at either, myself. But if I had to point my finger at one of the two, it's not gonna be the guy who dropped 41 points on great efficiency.
And should be used as such, though injuries have made that slightly harder. Also worth pointing out that he's been playing pretty heavy minutes.
 
#3
Bogi's BBIQ is in a constant battle with his ego. He's a smart player, with the exception of the blindspot that is his own sense of who he is. He thinks he's the ****, even on nights when he isn't. It's frustrating.

Buddy is who he is. A sharp shooting airhead.

I'm not above or below leveling criticism at either, myself. But if I had to point my finger at one of the two, it's not gonna be the guy who dropped 41 points on great efficiency.
Totally agree about Bogi. I like him a lot, but for a Euro player that is supposed to have a high BBIQ and be team oriented, tonight’s last shot is not a play I would expect him try to make — especially when he had two defenders on him and Buddy was open.

Another play Buddy isn’t getting credit for was blocking Marcus Smart after he stole the ball from Bogi. That was a hustle play. And the Celtics never scored on that possession as a result.

He deserved that last shot. And was the most likely to make it.
 

Kingster

Hall of Famer
#4
Bogi's BBIQ is in a constant battle with his ego. He's a smart player, with the exception of the blindspot that is his own sense of who he is. He thinks he's the ****, even on nights when he isn't. It's frustrating.

Buddy is who he is. A sharp shooting airhead.

I'm not above or below leveling criticism at either, myself. But if I had to point my finger at one of the two, it's not gonna be the guy who dropped 41 points on great efficiency.
They both have issues with ego. At times they think they are one-on-one superstars, not players who trust their teammates or who need to play within the team framework to be successful. Walton should just play a tape of himself so he doesn't have to lose his breath on the subject of passing and moving without the ball. Depress the play button when the ego-driven dribble monster takes hold. You would think that they have had enough bad experiences and coaching lectures from which they could moderate their bad impulses, but the ego monster never seems to go away, It arises especially after they get temporary success. When they F up they get chagrined, listen to the coach, and try to mend their ways like good little boys. When they succeed they think they succeeded solely by their own efforts and believe they can overthrow all the chains that bind them. They both have a ways to go before they acquire the undeviating self-mastery that doesn't yield to self-centered impulses of the moment.
 
#5
They both have issues with ego. At times they think they are one-on-one superstars, not players who trust their teammates or who need to play within the team framework to be successful. Walton should just play a tape of himself so he doesn't have to lose his breath on the subject of passing and moving without the ball. Depress the play button when the ego-driven dribble monster takes hold. You would think that they have had enough bad experiences and coaching lectures from which they could moderate their bad impulses, but the ego monster never seems to go away, It arises especially after they get temporary success. When they F up they get chagrined, listen to the coach, and try to mend their ways like good little boys. When they succeed they think they succeeded solely by their own efforts and believe they can overthrow all the chains that bind them. They both have a ways to go before they acquire the undeviating self-mastery that doesn't yield to self-centered impulses of the moment.
You basically described almost every star/rising star in the league, including at least two others on the Kings.
 
#6
The two best players on the floor last night were Hield and Smart.
It is annoying to listen to people that never played in college to berate them.
All of this babble about BBIQ is a lot of wishful thinking.
Good players are going to make some mistakes when they are involved in a lot of plays. Decisions have to be made quickly.
The Kings defense was good last night, but the Celtics was even better.
 
#7
The two best players on the floor last night were Hield and Smart.
It is annoying to listen to people that never played in college to berate them.
All of this babble about BBIQ is a lot of wishful thinking.
Good players are going to make some mistakes when they are involved in a lot of plays. Decisions have to be made quickly.
The Kings defense was good last night, but the Celtics was even better.
Some of the posters on this board meet your BBIQ debate qualifier.
 
#8
The two best players on the floor last night were Hield and Smart.
It is annoying to listen to people that never played in college to berate them.
All of this babble about BBIQ is a lot of wishful thinking.
Good players are going to make some mistakes when they are involved in a lot of plays. Decisions have to be made quickly.
The Kings defense was good last night, but the Celtics was even better.
Being the best player on the floor on a particular night doesn’t also mean that player has high BBIQ.

If you‘re a KINGS fan and watch most or all their games, you know Buddy makes lots of questionable decisions with the basketball, especially in crunch time. You are in denial if you believe otherwise. A vast majority of fans on this site recognize and acknowledge it — but you somehow believe you’re right?

Go to a Celtics site and ask them about Marcus Smart. He’s very similar. Hell, Celtics fans were killing him just a week or so ago when they played in SAC because he forced up an unnecessary shot after securing an offensive rebound where all he had to do pass or dribble the ball out and force an intentional foul.

Those are the types of plays low BBIQ players make. If you can’t recognize that, it says more about you than it does those that never played in college berating them.

Besides, what makes you more qualified? Did you play in college? Why is your anti-opinion less annoying?

Playing a sport in college or professionally isn’t a requisite to understanding the game or what you’re watching. There are a myriad of former players that can’t coach, teach or even analyze it well. There are coaches and teachers of the game that never played it at a high level. So stop with that nonsense.

Lastly, questioning BBIQ doesn’t mean those players aren’t good or great in other aspects. They obviously are because they are in the NBA and not just average players. But just as they have strengths, they also have weaknesses. And those two particular players have issues with BBIQ at times. It‘s what likely prevents them from becoming all star caliber and taking that next step.
 
#9
Being the best player on the floor on a particular night doesn’t also mean that player has high BBIQ.

If you‘re a KINGS fan and watch most or all their games, you know Buddy makes lots of questionable decisions with the basketball, especially in crunch time. You are in denial if you believe otherwise. A vast majority of fans on this site recognize and acknowledge it — but you somehow believe you’re right?

Go to a Celtics site and ask them about Marcus Smart. He’s very similar. Hell, Celtics fans were killing him just a week or so ago when they played in SAC because he forced up an unnecessary shot after securing an offensive rebound where all he had to do pass or dribble the ball out and force an intentional foul.

Those are the types of plays low BBIQ players make. If you can’t recognize that, it says more about you than it does those that never played in college berating them.

Besides, what makes you more qualified? Did you play in college? Why is your anti-opinion less annoying?

Playing a sport in college or professionally isn’t a requisite to understanding the game or what you’re watching. There are a myriad of former players that can’t coach, teach or even analyze it well. There are coaches and teachers of the game that never played it at a high level. So stop with that nonsense.

Lastly, questioning BBIQ doesn’t mean those players aren’t good or great in other aspects. They obviously are because they are in the NBA and not just average players. But just as they have strengths, they also have weaknesses. And those two particular players have issues with BBIQ at times. It‘s what likely prevents them from becoming all star caliber and taking that next step.
The subject of BBIQ has been around a lot longer than this board. I use the term on occasion, usually when we have a player who has a high propensity for making costly mistakes.
But there are times when some posters will line up like minions and start using the term far too loosely. That’s when some of us push back.
When posters say Bogi is low BBIQ because he shouldn’t take game-winning shots, well, there’s my evidence. And when posters say Buddy is high BBIQ because he’s a great shooter, well, that’s a pretty weak analysis IMO.
None of this is pointed at you, by the way. I’m just tagging onto your post because of the subject within the thread.
I love it when posters try to define BBIQ. It gets messy. It’s one of those things where the more you try and define it, the less you appear to understand it!
 
#10
The subject of BBIQ has been around a lot longer than this board. I use the term on occasion, usually when we have a player who has a high propensity for making costly mistakes.
But there are times when some posters will line up like minions and start using the term far too loosely. That’s when some of us push back.
When posters say Bogi is low BBIQ because he shouldn’t take game-winning shots, well, there’s my evidence. And when posters say Buddy is high BBIQ because he’s a great shooter, well, that’s a pretty weak analysis IMO.
None of this is pointed at you, by the way. I’m just tagging onto your post because of the subject within the thread.
I love it when posters try to define BBIQ. It gets messy. It’s one of those things where the more you try and define it, the less you appear to understand it!
If you play the style of basketball I like, high BBIQ. If you play the style I don't like, low BBIQ. There is your definition.

Fact is, Buddy and Bogi are playing the kind of ball that got them to this level. Buddy has to play with no fear. All action and reaction. He's not dumb. That lack of conscious is what allows him to have such high confidence. You have to live with a couple of turnovers from the guy who gets you 40 pts. Bogi, in his mind, is the one who should have the ball when it matters. He wants to hit the game winner every time. He wants the pressure on his shoulders. This won't change until someone else on the team shows the same desire to be that guy and actually has the talent to do it.

No player is perfect and very few are dumb in a basketball sense.
 
#11
When posters say Bogi is low BBIQ because he shouldn’t take game-winning shots, well, there’s my evidence.
Totally agree with the totality of your post.

With regard to the quote above, I'll clarify my stance in saying that I believed it to be a low IQ play. Which is why I was disappointed in Bogi because he's a player I consider to have high BBIQ on the whole.

But he was determined to shoot that shot no matter what (that's how it appeared to me) and it didn't matter that two defenders came to him and that Buddy came open (who was in his direct sightline) and that time wasn't forcing him to take that shot just yet (over 4 seconds to go).

I've never been a star basketball player. Never played at the pro level. But I've played enough ball in my lifetime and hate to lose so very, very much that I fully recognize when a teammate is white hot and almost always went out of my way to get that player the ball whenever possible. Unless I was hot myself, I surely know I'm not shooting the ball in that situation unless there's no choice. It's about the team and winning the game, not individual glory.

But that's just my way of seeing it.

If Bogi had passed up the shot he took and got he ball to Buddy and it didn't go in, I'd still contend that he made the right play.

I remember defending LBJ when he was widely criticized in CLE for not taking the final shot at the end of the game and, instead, passing to a wide open teammate that missed the shot. All the media pundits were dogging LBJ for not wanting to take the shot and be the 'man' when, in fact, he made the right basketball play.

That's precisely why I always liked and defended LBJ (prior to his LA LeBron days) because I felt he played the game the right way. Almost always made the right plays given the circumstances. That, to me, is true BBIQ. Knowing situation, score, etc. and making the right decisions. Whether they work out or not.

I play a lot of poker. I hardly ever get upset when I make the right decision and it doesn't work. I have the same attitude regarding my sports fandom and how I judge teams. players and coaches.
 
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#12
Totally agree with the totality of your post.
With regard to the quote above, I'll clarify my stance in saying that I believed it to be a low IQ play. Which is why I was disappointed in Bogi because he's a player I consider to have high BBIQ on the whole.
But he was determined to shoot that shot no matter what (that's how it appeared to me) and it didn't matter that two defenders came to him and that Buddy came open (who was in his direct sightline) and that time wasn't forcing him to take that shot just yet (over 4 seconds to go).
I love Bogi, but we do sometimes get the hero play from him which is not always the best basketball play (as you point out). He is who he is, and unless he comes to believe that one of his teammates can do it better than him, he will continue to make hero plays from time to time. It may be a weakness in his game (or personality), or it may be the thing that - one day - wins a championship. As close as he is to Buddy, and respects Buddy's game, Bogi doesn't think Buddy is ready for the hero play. Not yet, anyway.